intonation

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in·to·na·tion

 (ĭn′tə-nā′shən, -tō-)
n.
1.
a. The act of intoning or chanting.
b. An intoned utterance.
2. A manner of producing or uttering tones, especially with regard to accuracy of pitch.
3. Linguistics The use of changing pitch to convey syntactic information: a questioning intonation.
4. A use of pitch characteristic of a speaker or dialect: "He could hear authority, the old parish intonation coming back into his voice" (Graham Greene).
5. Music The opening phrase of a plainsong composition sung as a solo part.

in′to·na′tion·al adj.

intonation

(ˌɪntəʊˈneɪʃən)
n
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) the sound pattern of phrases and sentences produced by pitch variation in the voice
2. the act or manner of intoning
3. an intoned, chanted, or monotonous utterance; incantation
4. (Classical Music) music the opening of a piece of plainsong, sung by a soloist
5. (Classical Music) music
a. the correct or accurate pitching of intervals
b. the capacity to play or sing in tune. See also just intonation
ˌintoˈnational adj

in•to•na•tion

(ˌɪn toʊˈneɪ ʃən, -tə-)

n.
1. the pattern or melody of pitch changes in connected speech, esp. the pitch pattern of a sentence, which distinguishes kinds of sentences or speakers of different language cultures.
2. the act or manner of intonating.
3. the ability to produce musical tones on pitch.
4. something that is intoned.
5. the opening phrase of a Gregorian chant.
[< Medieval Latin]
in`to•na′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intonation - rise and fall of the voice pitchintonation - rise and fall of the voice pitch  
prosody, inflection - the patterns of stress and intonation in a language
intonation pattern - intonations characteristic of questions and requests and statements
droning, monotone, drone - an unchanging intonation
singsong - a regular and monotonous rising and falling intonation
2.intonation - singing by a soloist of the opening piece of plainsong
singing, vocalizing - the act of singing vocal music
3.intonation - the act of singing in a monotonous toneintonation - the act of singing in a monotonous tone
singing, vocalizing - the act of singing vocal music
cantillation - liturgical chanting
4.intonation - the production of musical tones (by voice or instrument); especially the exactitude of the pitch relations
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
fixed intonation - the intonation of keyboard instruments where the pitch of each note is fixed and cannot be varied by the performer

intonation

noun
1. tone, inflection, cadence, modulation, accentuation His voice had a very slight German intonation.
2. incantation, spell, charm, formula, chant, invocation, hex (U.S. & Canad. informal), conjuration They could hear strange music and chanting intonations.

intonation

noun
A particular vocal quality that indicates some emotion or feeling:
Idiom: tone of voice.
Translations
تَغَيُّر في حِدَّة الصَّوْت
intonace
intonation
intonáció
ítónun; hljómfall
intonacija
intonācija
intonácia
intonacija
tonlama

intonation

[ˌɪntəʊˈneɪʃən] Nentonación f

intonation

[ˌɪntəˈneɪʃən] nintonation f

intonation

nIntonation f; (Ling also) → Satzmelodie f

intonation

[ˌɪntəʊˈneɪʃn] n (Linguistics) → intonazione f

intonation

(intəˈneiʃən) noun
the rise and fall of the voice in speech.
References in classic literature ?
Having repeated them several times with various intonations, she sprang into the water, where she was suffered to drown.
At first he heard the sound of indifferent voices, then Anna Mikhaylovna's voice alone in a long speech, then a cry, then silence, then both voices together with glad intonations, and then footsteps.
Transcribed here the speech sounds harmless enough, particularly as uttered in the sweet, high, casual pipe with which, at all interlocutors, but above all at his eternal governess, he threw off intonations as if he were tossing roses.
She was in an agony of terror for Vronsky, but a still greater agony was the never-ceasing, as it seemed to her, stream of her husband's shrill voice with its familiar intonations.
His mother had two long conversations with Mills on his passage through Paris and had heard of me (I knew how that thick man could speak of people, he interjected ambiguously) and his mother, with an insatiable curiosity for anything that was rare (filially humorous accent here and a softer flash of teeth), was very anxious to have me presented to her(courteous intonation, but no teeth).
For the iambic is, of all measures, the most colloquial: we see it in the fact that conversational speech runs into iambic lines more frequently than into any other kind of verse; rarely into hexameters, and only when we drop the colloquial intonation.
She laughed very prettily, not so much at the sonnets, which she could not but esteem, as at poor Henry's French accent, which was unique, resembling the warbling of birds, if birds ever warbled with a stuttering, nasal intonation.
From the intonation of the words, she guessed, with her woman's quick intuition, at their meaning; but she quite failed to follow, when, becoming more pressing, he continued to urge his suit in a mixture of the grossest animal passion and ridiculous threats.
Gardner, with a slight intonation of tolerant wonder.
The old man motioned me in with his right hand with a courtly gesture, saying in excellent English, but with a strange intonation.
There was a rather pettish intonation in Fleur-de-Lys's-- laconic words.
Could not distinguish the words, but was convinced by the intonation that the speaker was an Italian.