intoxicating


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

in·tox·i·cate

 (ĭn-tŏk′sĭ-kāt′)
v. in·tox·i·cat·ed, in·tox·i·cat·ing, in·tox·i·cates
v.tr.
1.
a. To impair the physical and mental faculties of (a person) by means of alcohol or a drug or other chemical substance: served strong cocktails that intoxicated all the guests.
b. To damage physiologically by means of a chemical substance; poison: birds that were intoxicated by pesticides.
2. To stimulate or excite: "a man whom life intoxicates, who has no need of wine" (Anaïs Nin).
v.intr.
To cause impairment, stimulation, or excitement by or as if by use of a chemical substance: "The notion of Holy War is showing that it has not yet lost all its power to intoxicate and to inflame" (Conor Cruise O'Brien).

[Middle English, to poison, from Medieval Latin intoxicāre, intoxicāt- : Latin in-, in; see in-2 + Late Latin toxicāre, to smear with poison (from Latin toxicum, poison; see toxic).]

in·tox′i·cat′ing·ly adv.
in·tox′i·ca′tive adj.
in·tox′i·ca′tor n.

intoxicating

(ɪnˈtɒksɪˌkeɪtɪŋ)
adj
1. (Brewing) (of an alcoholic drink) producing in a person a state ranging from euphoria to stupor, usually accompanied by loss of inhibitions and control; inebriating
2. stimulating, exciting, or producing great elation
inˈtoxiˌcatingly adv
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.intoxicating - causing
alcoholic - characteristic of or containing alcohol; "alcoholic drinks"
2.intoxicating - extremely exciting as if by alcohol or a narcotic
exciting - creating or arousing excitement; "an exciting account of her trip"

intoxicating

adjective
1. alcoholic, strong, intoxicant, spirituous, inebriant intoxicating liquor
2. exciting, thrilling, stimulating, sexy (informal), heady, exhilarating The music is pulsating and the atmosphere intoxicating.

intoxicating

adjective
Producing or stimulating physical, mental, or emotional vigor:
Translations
مُسْكِر
omamnýopojný
berusende
részegítő
sem veldur ölvun; áfengur
opojný
sarhoş edici

intoxicating

[ɪnˈtɒksɪkeɪtɪŋ] ADJ
1. (frm) (lit) [substance] → narcótico, estupefaciente
an intoxicating mixture of gin, vodka and cokeuna mezcla de ginebra, vodka y Coca Cola con un efecto narcótico
intoxicating drink or liquorbebida f alcohólica
2. (fig) (liter) [success, perfume, atmosphere] → embriagador

intoxicating

[ɪnˈtɒksɪkeɪtɪŋ] adj
(= exciting) [atmosphere, music, fragrance] → enivrant(e)
the intoxicating fragrance of lilies → la fragrance enivrante des lis
[drink] → alcoolisé(e) intoxicating liquorintoxicating liquor nboissons fpl alcoolisées

intoxicate

(inˈtoksikeit) verb
to make drunk.
inˌtoxiˈcation noun
inˈtoxicating adjective
References in classic literature ?
He never had been drunk before, and indeed in all his fife had never taken a drink of anything intoxicating, but he felt he needed to be drunk that one time and so went and did it.
All the music that they had ever heard before seemed spiritless prentice-work and barren of grace and charm when compared with these intoxicating floods of melodious sound.
The changing of the bare, ugly little schoolroom into a bower of beauty; Miss Dearborn's pleasure at her success with the Simpson twins' recitation; the privilege of decorating the blackboard; the happy thought of drawing Columbia from the cigar box; the intoxicating moment when the school clapped her
I stole some bread, some rind of cheese, about half a jar of mincemeat (which I tied up in my pocket-handkerchief with my last night's slice), some brandy from a stone bottle (which I decanted into a glass bottle I had secretly used for making that intoxicating fluid, Spanish-liquorice-water, up in my room: diluting the stone bottle from a jug in the kitchen cupboard), a meat bone with very little on it, and a beautiful round compact pork pie.
In the morning of life they are rapt by intoxicating visions of some great haberdashery business, beckoned to by the voluptuous enticements of the legal profession, or maybe the Holy Grail they forswear all else to seek is a snug editorial chair.
To act as I have acted, to think as I have thought, requires the maddening love of pleasure, mingled with the keen appetite of revenge, the proud consciousness of power; droughts too intoxicating for the human heart to bear, and yet retain the power to prevent.
In society there were silly conversations lasting half a minute, cool acquaintanceships founded on such half-minutes, general reciprocity of suspicion, overcrowding, insufficient ventilation, bad music badly executed, late hours, unwholesome food, intoxicating liquors, jealous competition in useless expenditure, husband-hunting, flirting, dancing, theatres, and concerts.
Ultimately, when stubborn historical facts had dispersed all intoxicating effects of self-deception, this form of Socialism ended in a miserable fit of the blues.
If the triumph of the will is one of the intoxicating pleasures in the lives of great men, it is the ALL of life to narrow minds.
Friquet and Nanette continued to shout; the cries, the noise of the shot and the intoxicating smell of powder produced their usual maddening effects.
Meanwhile, the three gentlemen behaved in such a manner as proved that the water of the Fountain of Youth possessed some intoxicating qualities; unless, indeed, their exhilaration of spirits were merely a lightsome dizziness caused by the sudden removal of the weight of years.
For this new promise of happiness following so quickly on the shock of pain had an intoxicating effect on the sober Adam, who had all his life been used to much hardship and moderate hope.