intragenerational mobility

Related to intragenerational mobility: horizontal mobility

intragenerational mobility

(ˌɪntrəˌdʒɛnəˈreɪʃənəl)
n
(Sociology) sociol movement within or between social classes and occupations, the change occurring within an individual's lifetime. Compare intergenerational mobility
References in periodicals archive ?
It is not feasible to compare intergenerational mobility over time in the way we have done for intragenerational mobility.
Intragenerational mobility describes how a given person's economic status changes over the course of his lifetime.
If intragenerational mobility is high, then any snapshot of inequality will overstate the actual long-term inequality among individuals.
Depending on the number and size of the cohorts, and the time during which they are followed, pseudo-panels may provide reliable estimations of absolute or relative intragenerational mobility, and may shed some light on whether the share of entrepreneurs in the cohorts is associated with higher or lower mobility (upward or downward mobility), depending on the estimation technique.
All the studies coincide in that entrepreneurship is associated with higher social mobility, whether within or across generations, and in the case of intragenerational mobility, whether it is absolute or relative.
But when the assumption that measures of intragenerational mobility are invariant over the time period measured is dropped and tested using moving 5-year windows that allow us to measure mobility before and after reunification for this population, we find evidence that a great social transformation, in this case German reunification, is coincident with a significant decline in their income mobility.
In addition to the Shorrocks R, we examine trends in intragenerational mobility using decomposition methods developed by Gottschalk and Moffitt (1994).
Keywords: economic mobility, intragenerational mobility, inequality, income distribution, public policy
Relative intragenerational mobility is concerned with the ease with which workers are able to move into higher income brackets relative to their income peer group and specific to only one generation of workers.
that intragenerational mobility among young adults has been stable since
Manza, Hout and Brooks (1995) provide a classification of five distinct theoretical explanations for the decline of class voting in modern industrial societies: 1) class voting is declining because the "embourgeoisement" of the working class as well as strong intergenerational and intragenerational mobility undermine the formation of a "working-class consciousness"; 2) the significance of traditional classes in voting behavior decreases as the role of new forms of social differentiation becomes more important (gender, race, ethnicity, various "identity groups", etc.
In the case of intergenerational mobility, the focus of analysis is on mobility between the past and the present generations, but in the case of intragenerational mobility it is the mobility within one and the same generation that constitutes the object of study.