intransigent

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Related to intransigents: succinctness, transitoriness, inordinately, adroitly

in·tran·si·gent

also in·tran·si·geant  (ĭn-trăn′sə-jənt, -zə-)
adj.
Refusing to moderate a position, especially an extreme position; uncompromising.

[French intransigeant, from Spanish intransigente : in-, not (from Latin; see in-1) + transigente, present participle of transigir, to compromise (from Latin trānsigere, to come to an agreement : trāns-, trans- + agere, to drive; see ag- in Indo-European roots).]

in·tran′si·gence, in·tran′si·gen·cy n.
in·tran′si·gent n.
in·tran′si·gent·ly adv.

intransigent

or

intransigeant

adj
not willing to compromise; obstinately maintaining an attitude
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an intransigent person, esp in politics
[C19: from Spanish los intransigentes the uncompromising (ones), a name adopted by certain political extremists, from in-1 + transigir to compromise, from Latin transigere to settle; see transact]
inˈtransigence, inˈtransigeance, inˈtransigency n
inˈtransigently, inˈtransigeantly adv

in•tran•si•gent

or in•tran•si•geant

(ɪnˈtræn sɪ dʒənt)

adj.
1. refusing to agree or compromise; uncompromising; inflexible.
n.
2. an intransigent person, as in politics.
[1875–80; < French intransigeant < Sp intransigente=in- in-3 + transigente accommodating]
in•tran′si•gence, in•tran′si•gen•cy, n.
in•tran′si•gent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.intransigent - impervious to pleas, persuasion, requests, reason; "he is adamant in his refusal to change his mind"; "Cynthia was inexorable; she would have none of him"- W.Churchill; "an intransigent conservative opposed to every liberal tendency"
inflexible - incapable of change; "a man of inflexible purpose"

intransigent

intransigent

adjective
Translations

intransigent

[ɪnˈtrænsɪdʒənt] ADJintransigente

intransigent

[ɪnˈtrænsɪənt] adjintransigeant(e)

intransigent

adjunnachgiebig

intransigent

[ɪnˈtrænsɪdʒnt] adjintransigente
References in periodicals archive ?
If we can win them over, produce a major realignment solidly in favour of gay rights, the intransigents (like the racists of twenty years ago) will eventually be effectively silenced by both law and polite society" (p.
The acronym, short for Not In My Back Yard, usually conjures up images of small-minded and small-town intransigents, people who resist any change in the local law or landscape for their own selfish reasons.
Instead, the conclave of 1903 elected Pius X, whom the Italian government had dubbed "the most intransigent of the intransigents.