intransitive


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transitive and intransitive verbs

English verbs are split into two major categories depending on how they function in a sentence: transitive and intransitive. Transitive verbs take one or more objects in a sentence, while intransitive verbs take no objects in a sentence.
Put simply, a transitive verb describes an action that is happening to something or someone, which is known as the verb’s direct object.
An intransitive verb, on the other hand, describes an action that does not happen to something or someone.
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in·tran·si·tive

 (ĭn-trăn′sĭ-tĭv, -zĭ-)
adj. Abbr. intr. or int. or i.
Designating a verb or verb construction that does not require or cannot take a direct object, as snow or sleep.
n.
An intransitive verb.

in·tran′si·tive·ly adv.
in·tran′si·tive·ness, in·tran′si·tiv′i·ty n.

intransitive

(ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv)
adj
1. (Grammar)
a. denoting a verb when it does not require a direct object
b. denoting a verb that customarily does not require a direct object: "to faint" is an intransitive verb.
c. (as noun) a verb in either of these categories
2. (Grammar) denoting an adjective or noun that does not require any particular noun phrase as a referent
3. (Logic) logic maths (of a relation) having the property that if it holds between one argument and a second, and between the second and a third, it must fail to hold between the first and the third: "being the mother of" is an intransitive relation.
inˈtransitively adv
inˌtransiˈtivity, inˈtransitiveness n

in•tran•si•tive

(ɪnˈtræn sɪ tɪv)
adj.
1. of or being a verb that indicates a complete action without being accompanied by a direct object, as sit or lie, and that in English does not form a passive.
n.
2. an intransitive verb.
[1605–15; < Late Latin]
in•tran′si•tive•ly, adv.
in•tran′si•tive•ness, in•tran`si•tiv′i•ty, n.

intransitive

Used to describe a verb that does not have a direct object. Compare transitive.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intransitive - a verb (or verb construction) that does not take an object
verb - the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
Adj.1.intransitive - designating a verb that does not require or cannot take a direct object
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
transitive - designating a verb that requires a direct object to complete the meaning
Translations
فِعْل لازِم
nepřechodný
intransitiv
intransitiivinen
tárgyatlan
áhrifslaus
intranzityviaiintranzityvusnegalininkinis
nepārejošs
nieprzechodni
intransitiv
neprechodný
geçişsiznesnesiz

intransitive

[ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv] ADJ (Ling) → intransitivo

intransitive

[ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv] adjintransitif/ive intransitive verbintransitive verb nverbe m intransitifintra-uterine device nstérilet m, dispositif m intra-utérin

intransitive

adj verbintransitiv
nIntransitiv nt

intransitive

[ɪnˈtrænsɪtɪv] adj (Gram) → intransitivo/a

intransitive

(inˈtrӕnsitiv) adjective
(of a verb) that does not have an object. The baby lay on the floor and kicked; Go and fetch the book!
inˈtransitively adverb
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 includes the imperative of intransitive verbs under cond.
The latter are illustrated particularly by causatives such as that in We walked the horses back to the paddock, with a causative converted from an intransitive.
Lately I've been putting in the legwork as far as trying to nail down verbs in the transitive and intransitive case.
most intransitive verbs are conjugated with the auxiliary essere.
However, Westhelle reforms this formula into its intransitive understanding.
It functions as a subject if it occurs with an intransitive verb, and as an agent if it occurs with a transitive verb.
Verbs can be intransitive, transitive or ditransitive predicates, while words belonging to other word categories can only be intransitive predicates.
Rather than focusing on the transitive versus the intransitive meaning of the verb to coordinate, I suggest that a much more useful distinction is the Hayekian focus on the equilibration process, versus the Schelling (and more generally, mainstream neoclassical) focus on the choice among potential equilibria.
In the mechanical sense, the verb is intransitive and relates to the state in which the poems are found; operational, ready to perform their proper function, as Oxford would put it.
Speaking of "laying"--or "layin" as we say in Texas--it is worth repeating that "lie" is intransitive (you recline, for example) and cannot take a direct object while "lay" (I lay down my cards) always needs an object because it is a transitive verb (lay down your gun).
A transitive triad has all three participants connected (A is connected to B, who is connected to C, who is connected to A), while an intransitive triad has an open link (A is connected to B, and A is connected to C, but B is not connected to C).
Hennix's text was called "17 Points on Intensional Logics for Intransitive Experiences, 1969-1979" (intensional with an s is a technical term in logic).