intrigue


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in·trigue

 (ĭn′trēg′, ĭn-trēg′)
n.
1.
a. A secret or underhand scheme; a plot.
b. The practice of or involvement in such schemes: seized the throne by intrigue.
2. A clandestine love affair.
v. (ĭn-trēg′) in·trigued, in·trigu·ing, in·trigues
v.tr.
1. To arouse the interest or curiosity of: Hibernation has long intrigued biologists.
2. To effect or cause to be accepted or rejected by secret scheming or plotting: "Mr. Clay ... was intrigued out of the Presidential nomination" (Parke Godwin).
v.intr.
To engage in secret or underhand schemes; plot.

[From French intriguer, to plot, from Italian intrigare, to plot, from Latin intrīcāre, to entangle; see intricate.]

in·trigu′er n.
in′trigu′ing·ly adv.
Usage Note: The introduction of the verb intrigue to mean "to arouse the interest or curiosity of" was initially resisted by writers on usage as an unneeded French substitute for available English words such as interest, fascinate, or puzzle, but it now appears to be well established. As long ago as 1988, 78 percent of the Usage Panel accepted it in the sentence The special-quota idea intrigues some legislators, who have asked a Washington think tank to evaluate it. This represented a dramatic increase over the 52 percent who accepted the word in 1968.

intrigue

vb, -trigues, -triguing or -trigued
1. (tr) to make interested or curious: I'm intrigued by this case, Watson.
2. (intr) to make secret plots or employ underhand methods; conspire
3. (often foll by: with) to carry on a clandestine love affair
n
4. the act or an instance of secret plotting, etc
5. a clandestine love affair
6. the quality of arousing interest or curiosity; beguilement
[C17: from French intriguer, from Italian intrigare, from Latin intrīcāre; see intricate]
inˈtriguer n

in•trigue

(v. ɪnˈtrig; n. also ˈɪn trig)

v. -trigued, -tri•guing,
n. v.t.
1. to arouse the curiosity or interest of by unusual, new, or otherwise fascinating qualities.
2. to accomplish or force by crafty plotting or underhand machinations.
3. Obs. to entangle.
4. Obs. to trick or cheat.
v.i.
5. to plot craftily or underhandedly.
6. to carry on a secret or illicit love affair.
n.
7. the use of underhand machinations or deceitful stratagems.
8. such a machination or stratagem or a series of them; a plot or crafty dealing: political intrigues.
9. a secret or illicit love affair.
[1640–50; < French intriguer < Italian intrigare < Upper Italian < Latin intrīcāre to entangle; see intricate]
in•tri′guing•ly, adv.
syn: See conspiracy.

intrigue


Past participle: intrigued
Gerund: intriguing

Imperative
intrigue
intrigue
Present
I intrigue
you intrigue
he/she/it intrigues
we intrigue
you intrigue
they intrigue
Preterite
I intrigued
you intrigued
he/she/it intrigued
we intrigued
you intrigued
they intrigued
Present Continuous
I am intriguing
you are intriguing
he/she/it is intriguing
we are intriguing
you are intriguing
they are intriguing
Present Perfect
I have intrigued
you have intrigued
he/she/it has intrigued
we have intrigued
you have intrigued
they have intrigued
Past Continuous
I was intriguing
you were intriguing
he/she/it was intriguing
we were intriguing
you were intriguing
they were intriguing
Past Perfect
I had intrigued
you had intrigued
he/she/it had intrigued
we had intrigued
you had intrigued
they had intrigued
Future
I will intrigue
you will intrigue
he/she/it will intrigue
we will intrigue
you will intrigue
they will intrigue
Future Perfect
I will have intrigued
you will have intrigued
he/she/it will have intrigued
we will have intrigued
you will have intrigued
they will have intrigued
Future Continuous
I will be intriguing
you will be intriguing
he/she/it will be intriguing
we will be intriguing
you will be intriguing
they will be intriguing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been intriguing
you have been intriguing
he/she/it has been intriguing
we have been intriguing
you have been intriguing
they have been intriguing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been intriguing
you will have been intriguing
he/she/it will have been intriguing
we will have been intriguing
you will have been intriguing
they will have been intriguing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been intriguing
you had been intriguing
he/she/it had been intriguing
we had been intriguing
you had been intriguing
they had been intriguing
Conditional
I would intrigue
you would intrigue
he/she/it would intrigue
we would intrigue
you would intrigue
they would intrigue
Past Conditional
I would have intrigued
you would have intrigued
he/she/it would have intrigued
we would have intrigued
you would have intrigued
they would have intrigued
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intrigue - a crafty and involved plot to achieve your (usually sinister) endsintrigue - a crafty and involved plot to achieve your (usually sinister) ends
plot, secret plan, game - a secret scheme to do something (especially something underhand or illegal); "they concocted a plot to discredit the governor"; "I saw through his little game from the start"
priestcraft - a derogatory reference to priests who use their influence to control secular or political affairs
2.intrigue - a clandestine love affair
love affair, romance - a relationship between two lovers
Verb1.intrigue - cause to be interested or curiousintrigue - cause to be interested or curious  
grab, seize - capture the attention or imagination of; "This story will grab you"; "The movie seized my imagination"
matter to, interest - be of importance or consequence; "This matters to me!"
2.intrigue - form intrigues (for) in an underhand manner
plot - plan secretly, usually something illegal; "They plotted the overthrow of the government"

intrigue

noun
2. affair, romance, intimacy, liaison, amour She detected her husband in an intrigue with a prostitute.
verb
1. interest, fascinate, arouse the curiosity of, attract, charm, rivet, titillate, pique, tickle your fancy The novelty of the situation intrigued him.
2. plot, scheme, manoeuvre, conspire, connive, machinate The main characters spend their time intriguing for control.

intrigue

noun
A secret plan to achieve an evil or illegal end:
verb
1. To work out a secret plan to achieve an evil or illegal end:
2. To arouse the interest and attention of:
Slang: turn on.
Translations
مُؤامَرَه، مكيدَهيَتآمَر على، يُدَبِّر مكيدَهيَفْتِن، يَسْحَر
intrikovatpletichaupoutat
fængslefascinereindtrigeintrigere
intrikaintrikál
ráîabruggstanda í ráîabruggivekja forvitni
intrigosintriguojantisintriguotikeliantis smalsumąpinklės
aizrautintrigaintriģētvērpt intrigas
intriga
dolapentrikaentrika/dolap çevirmekmerakını uyandırmak

intrigue

[ɪnˈtriːg]
A. N (= plot) → intriga f; (amorous) → aventura f (sentimental), amorío m
a web of intrigueuna maraña de intriga
B. VTfascinar
I am intrigued to know whetherme intriga saber si ..., estoy intrigado por saber si ...
we were intrigued by a sign outside a shopnos llamó la atención el letrero de una tienda
C. VIintrigar (against contra)

intrigue

[ˈɪntriːg]
nintrigue f
[ɪnˈtriːg] vtintriguer
The idea seemed to intrigue him → L'idée semblait l'intriguer.
They are intrigued by her story → Ils sont intrigués par son histoire., Son histoire les intrigue

intrigue

vt (= arouse interest of)faszinieren; (= arouse curiosity of)neugierig machen; to be intrigued with or by somethingvon etw fasziniert sein; I would be intrigued to know why …es würde mich schon interessieren, warum …; I’m intrigued to hear what she’s been sayingich würde wirklich gerne hören, was sie gesagt hat
n
(= plot)Intrige f; (no pl: = plotting) → Intrigen (→ spiel nt) pl
(dated: = love affair) → Liaison f, → Liebschaft f

intrigue

[ɪnˈtriːg]
1. n (plot) → intrigo; (amorous) → tresca
2. vt (fascinate) → intrigare, affascinare; (make curious) → incuriosire
3. vicomplottare, tramare

intrigue

(inˈtriːg) , (ˈintriːg) noun
the activity of plotting or scheming; a plot or scheme. He became president as a result of (a) political intrigue.
(inˈtriːg) verb
1. to fascinate, arouse the curiosity of or amuse. The book intrigued me.
2. to plot or scheme.
inˈtriguing adjective
curious or amusing. an intriguing idea.
References in classic literature ?
his own mind full of intrigue, that he should suspect it in others.
I receive the money, not only as my right, but also as a proper compensation for the injustice which I suffered from my father, and a proper penalty paid by my younger brother for the vile intrigue by which he succeeded in disinheriting me.
The Court, from that exclusive inner circle to its outermost rotten ring of intrigue, corruption, and dissimulation, was all gone together.
What strange perfumes seemed to waft across from it, perfumes laden with associations of a world so different from the green world where it now was, a charming world of gay intrigue and wanton pleasure.
And from this time began an intrigue between his majesty and a junto of ministers, maliciously bent against me, which broke out in less than two months, and had like to have ended in my utter destruction.
This beautiful capitol, like every capitol since the dawn of civilization, is often a place of intrigue and calculation.
Camilla was uneasy at this, dreading lest it might prove the means of endangering her honour, and asked whether her intrigue had gone beyond words, and she with little shame and much effrontery said it had; for certain it is that ladies' imprudences make servants shameless, who, when they see their mistresses make a false step, think nothing of going astray themselves, or of its being known.
Such an infatuated policy, such a desperate expedient, might, by the multiplication of petty offices, answer the views of men who possess not qualifications to extend their influence beyond the narrow circles of personal intrigue, but it could never promote the greatness or happiness of the people of America.
Men of factious tempers, of local prejudices, or of sinister designs, may, by intrigue, by corruption, or by other means, first obtain the suffrages, and then betray the interests, of the people.
The "dangerous class," the social scum, that passively rotting mass thrown off by the lowest layers of old society, may, here and there, be swept into the movement by a proletarian revolution; its conditions of life, however, prepare it far more for the part of a bribed tool of reactionary intrigue.
Tell him not to intrigue with the Bonapartists, as he is now doing about that theatre.
He asked himself whether there had not been a wicked elopement; and this idea so impressed itself upon his mind that he determined to make use of the supposed intrigue.