introspection

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in·tro·spec·tion

 (ĭn′trə-spĕk′shən)
n.
Contemplation of one's own thoughts, feelings, and sensations; self-examination.

in′tro·spec′tion·al adj.

introspection

(ˌɪntrəˈspɛkʃən)
n
the examination of one's own thoughts, impressions, and feelings, esp for long periods
[C17: from Latin intrōspicere to look within, from intro- + specere to look]
ˌintroˈspectional, ˌintroˈspective adj
ˌintroˈspectionist n
ˌintroˈspectively adv
ˌintroˈspectiveness n

in•tro•spec•tion

(ˌɪn trəˈspɛk ʃən)

n.
1. observation or examination of one's own mental and emotional state, mental processes, etc.
2. the tendency or disposition to do this.
[1670–80; derivative, on the model of inspection, from Latin intrōspicere to look into]
in`tro•spec′tion•al, adj.
in`tro•spec′tion•ist, n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.introspection - the contemplation of your own thoughts and desires and conductintrospection - the contemplation of your own thoughts and desires and conduct
musing, reflection, rumination, thoughtfulness, contemplation, reflexion - a calm, lengthy, intent consideration
self-analysis, soul-searching - a penetrating examination of your own beliefs and motives
examen, examination - a detailed inspection of your conscience (as done daily by Jesuits)

introspection

noun self-examination, brooding, self-analysis, navel-gazing (slang), introversion, heart-searching He had always had his moments of quiet introspection.
Translations
introspekce
introspekcijasamoopažanje

introspection

[ˌɪntrəʊˈspekʃən] Nintrospección f

introspection

[ˌɪntrəˈspɛkʃən] nintrospection f

introspection

nSelbstbeobachtung f, → Introspektion f (geh)

introspection

[ˌɪntrəʊˈspɛkʃn] nintrospezione f

in·tro·spec·tion

n. introspección, análisis propio o de sí mismo-a.

introspection

n introspección f
References in classic literature ?
In reality, they are as unmethodical as possible; they possess none of the special features by which we distinguish the introspections of experimental psychology from the casual introspections of everyday life.
discussing the effect of repeated similar stimuli in producing and modifying our images, he says: "We choose a case of mnemic excitement whose existence we can perceive for ourselves by introspection, and seek to ekphore the bodily picture of our nearest relation in his absence, and have thus a pure mnemic excitement before us.
So far as I can judge by introspection, this does occur in practice.