introspection

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in·tro·spec·tion

 (ĭn′trə-spĕk′shən)
n.
Contemplation of one's own thoughts, feelings, and sensations; self-examination.

in′tro·spec′tion·al adj.

introspection

(ˌɪntrəˈspɛkʃən)
n
the examination of one's own thoughts, impressions, and feelings, esp for long periods
[C17: from Latin intrōspicere to look within, from intro- + specere to look]
ˌintroˈspectional, ˌintroˈspective adj
ˌintroˈspectionist n
ˌintroˈspectively adv
ˌintroˈspectiveness n

in•tro•spec•tion

(ˌɪn trəˈspɛk ʃən)

n.
1. observation or examination of one's own mental and emotional state, mental processes, etc.
2. the tendency or disposition to do this.
[1670–80; derivative, on the model of inspection, from Latin intrōspicere to look into]
in`tro•spec′tion•al, adj.
in`tro•spec′tion•ist, n., adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.introspection - the contemplation of your own thoughts and desires and conductintrospection - the contemplation of your own thoughts and desires and conduct
musing, reflection, rumination, thoughtfulness, contemplation, reflexion - a calm, lengthy, intent consideration
self-analysis, soul-searching - a penetrating examination of your own beliefs and motives
examen, examination - a detailed inspection of your conscience (as done daily by Jesuits)

introspection

noun self-examination, brooding, self-analysis, navel-gazing (slang), introversion, heart-searching He had always had his moments of quiet introspection.
Translations
introspekce
introspekcijasamoopažanje

introspection

[ˌɪntrəʊˈspekʃən] Nintrospección f

introspection

[ˌɪntrəˈspɛkʃən] nintrospection f

introspection

nSelbstbeobachtung f, → Introspektion f (geh)

introspection

[ˌɪntrəʊˈspɛkʃn] nintrospezione f

in·tro·spec·tion

n. introspección, análisis propio o de sí mismo-a.

introspection

n introspección f
References in classic literature ?
In the New South Dock there was certainly no time for remorse, introspection, repentance, or any phenomena of inner life either for the captive ships or for their officers.
He thus typified the constant introspection wherewith he tortured, but could not purify himself.
He accepted the deformity which had made life so hard for him; he knew that it had warped his character, but now he saw also that by reason of it he had acquired that power of introspection which had given him so much delight.