intrusion


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in·tru·sion

 (ĭn-tro͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act of intruding or the condition of being intruded on.
2. An inappropriate or unwelcome addition.
3. Geology
a. The forcing of molten rock into an earlier formation.
b. The rock mass produced by an intrusive process.

intrusion

(ɪnˈtruːʒən)
n
1. the act or an instance of intruding; an unwelcome visit, interjection, etc: an intrusion on one's privacy.
2. (Geological Science)
a. the movement of magma from within the earth's crust into spaces in the overlying strata to form igneous rock
b. any igneous rock formed in this way
3. (Law) property law an unlawful entry onto land by a stranger after determination of a particular estate of freehold and before the remainderman or reversioner has made entry
inˈtrusional adj

in•tru•sion

(ɪnˈtru ʒən)

n.
1. an act or instance of intruding.
2. the state of being intruded.
3. an illegal act of entering or taking possession of another's property.
4.
a. emplacement of molten rock in preexisting rock.
b. plutonic rock emplaced in this manner.
c. a process analogous to magmatic intrusion, as the injection of a plug of salt into sedimentary rocks.
d. the matter forced in.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin intrūsiō=intrūd(ere) (see intrude) + Latin -tio -tion]
in•tru′sion•al, adj.

in·tru·sion

(ĭn-tro͞o′zhən)
The movement of magma through underground rocks within the Earth, usually in an upward direction. ♦ Rocks that formed from the underground cooling of magma are called intrusive rocks. Compare extrusion.

intrusion

Movement of a unit or force within another nation's specified operational area outside of territorial seas and territorial airspace for surveillance or intelligence gathering in time of peace or tension.

Intrusion

 of cockroaches—Lipton, 1970.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intrusion - any entry into an area not previously occupiedintrusion - any entry into an area not previously occupied; "an invasion of tourists"; "an invasion of locusts"
entering, entrance - a movement into or inward
2.intrusion - entrance by force or without permission or welcome
incoming, ingress, entering, entrance, entry - the act of entering; "she made a grand entrance"
3.intrusion - the forcing of molten rock into fissures or between strata of an earlier rock formation
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
4.intrusion - rock produced by an intrusive process
rock, stone - a lump or mass of hard consolidated mineral matter; "he threw a rock at me"
5.intrusion - entry to another's property without right or permissionintrusion - entry to another's property without right or permission
actus reus, wrongful conduct, misconduct, wrongdoing - activity that transgresses moral or civil law; "he denied any wrongdoing"
inroad - an encroachment or intrusion; "they made inroads in the United States market"

intrusion

noun
1. interruption, interference, infringement, trespass, encroachment I hope you don't mind this intrusion.
2. invasion, breach, infringement, infiltration, encroachment, infraction, usurpation I felt it was a grotesque intrusion into our lives.

intrusion

noun
1. The act or an instance of interfering or intruding:
2. An advance beyond proper or legal limits:
3. An excessive, unwelcome burden:
Translations
تَدَخُّل، تَطَفُّل، دُخول بدون إذْن
dotěrnost
forstyrrelseindtrængen
betolakodás
òaî aî ryîjast inn, uppátroîsla; truflun
davetsiz girmekarışmamüdahale

intrusion

[ɪnˈtruːʒən] Nintrusión f; (on sb's privacy) → intromisión f, invasión f
pardon the intrusionsiento tener que importunarla
the intrusion of sentimentalityla intrusión del sentimentalismo

intrusion

[ɪnˈtruːʒən] nintrusion f
I hope you don't mind this intrusion → J'espère que vous me pardonnerez cette intrusion.
an intrusion into sb's privacy → un atteinte à la vie privée de qn
It was an unthinkable intrusion into our private life → C'était une atteinte à notre vie privée tout à fait impensable.

intrusion

n
Störung f; forgive the intrusion, I just wanted to ask …entschuldigen Sie, wenn ich hier so eindringe, ich wollte nur fragen; the intrusion of or on his privacydie Verletzung seiner Privatsphäre; the sudden intrusion of the outside worlddas plötzliche Eindringen der Außenwelt; they regarded her presence as an intrusionsie betrachteten ihre Anwesenheit als störend
(= forcing: of opinions, advice, one’s presence) → Aufdrängen nt

intrusion

[ɪnˈtruːʒn] nintrusione f

intrude

(inˈtruːd) verb
(sometimes with on) to enter, or cause (something) to enter, when unwelcome or unwanted. He opened her door and said `I'm sorry to intrude'; I'm sorry to intrude on your time.
inˈtruder noun
a person who intrudes, eg a burglar. Fit a good lock to your door to keep out intruders.
inˈtrusion (-ʒən) noun
(an) act of intruding. Please forgive this intrusion.
References in classic literature ?
He resented the intrusion of the children, who gaped with wondering eyes at him, sitting so stiff up there in their mother's bright atelier.
Though her presence was altogether an intrusion, it was unheeded.
As they did not mix with the immigrant women--Miss Jessie's good-natured intrusion into one of their half-nomadic camps one day having been met with rudeness and suspicion--they gradually fell into the way of trusting the responsibility of new acquaintances to the hands of their original hosts, and of consulting them in the matter of local recreation.
We looked on with- out apprehension, for they were fast getting past ability to go for help against us, and the arena was far enough from the public road to be safe from intrusion.
Elinor and her mother rose up in amazement at their entrance, and while the eyes of both were fixed on him with an evident wonder and a secret admiration which equally sprung from his appearance, he apologized for his intrusion by relating its cause, in a manner so frank and so graceful that his person, which was uncommonly handsome, received additional charms from his voice and expression.
Reed had been dead nine years: it was in this chamber he breathed his last; here he lay in state; hence his coffin was borne by the undertaker's men; and, since that day, a sense of dreary consecration had guarded it from frequent intrusion.
Well knowing this (the letter proceeded to say), he had nevertheless persisted in forcing himself upon her as a species of family connection: and she had weakly sanctioned the intrusion, solely from the dread that he would otherwise introduce himself to Mr.
It's only to say, on reflection,' observed a voice behind Uriah, as Uriah's head was pushed away, and the speaker's substituted - 'pray excuse me for this intrusion - that as it seems I have no choice in the matter, the sooner I go abroad the better.
But sometimes it happened that Marner, pausing to adjust an irregularity in his thread, became aware of the small scoundrels, and, though chary of his time, he liked their intrusion so ill that he would descend from his loom, and, opening the door, would fix on them a gaze that was always enough to make them take to their legs in terror.
But first the lawless Tyrant, who denies To know thir God, or message to regard, Must be compelld by Signes and Judgements dire; To blood unshed the Rivers must be turnd, Frogs, Lice and Flies must all his Palace fill With loath'd intrusion, and fill all the land; His Cattel must of Rot and Murren die, Botches and blaines must all his flesh imboss, And all his people; Thunder mixt with Haile, Haile mixt with fire must rend th' EGYPTIAN Skie And wheel on th' Earth, devouring where it rouls; What it devours not, Herb, or Fruit, or Graine, A darksom Cloud of Locusts swarming down Must eat, and on the ground leave nothing green: Darkness must overshadow all his bounds, Palpable darkness, and blot out three dayes; Last with one midnight stroke all the first-born Of EGYPT must lie dead.
it is not fit for such as we to sit with the rulers of the land,'' said the Jew; whose ambition for precedence though it had led him to dispute Place with the extenuated and impoverished descendant of the line of Montdidier, by no means stimulated him to an intrusion upon the privileges of the wealthy Saxons.
If you attempt to follow, Miss Wylie, I shall regard it as an intrusion.