intrusive


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Related to intrusive: extrusive, Intrusive Rock

in·tru·sive

 (ĭn-tro͞o′sĭv, -zĭv)
adj.
1. Intruding or tending to intrude.
2. Geology Of or relating to igneous rock that is forced while molten into cracks or between other layers of rock.
3. Linguistics Epenthetic.

in·tru′sive·ly adv.
in·tru′sive·ness n.

intrusive

(ɪnˈtruːsɪv)
adj
1. characterized by intrusion or tending to intrude
2. (Geological Science) (of igneous rocks) formed by intrusion. Compare extrusive2
3. (Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics relating to or denoting a speech sound that is introduced into a word or piece of connected speech for a phonetic rather than a historical or grammatical reason, such as the (r) often pronounced between idea and of in the idea of it
inˈtrusively adv
inˈtrusiveness n

in•tru•sive

(ɪnˈtru sɪv)

adj.
1. tending or apt to intrude; annoying.
2. characterized by or involving intrusion.
3. intruding; thrusting in.
4.
a. (of a rock) having been forced between preexisting rocks or rock layers while in a molten or plastic condition.
b. of or pertaining to plutonic rocks.
5. of or designating a speech sound inserted in connected speech where it is not present in the spelling, as an r-sound inserted by some speakers before -ing in the word drawing; excrescent.
[1375–1425]
in•tru′sive•ly, adv.
in•tru′sive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.intrusive - tending to intrude (especially upon privacy); "she felt her presence there was intrusive"
not intrusive, unintrusive - not interfering or meddling
2.intrusive - of rock material; forced while molten into cracks between layers of other rock
geology - a science that deals with the history of the earth as recorded in rocks
extrusive - of rock material; forced out while molten through cracks in the earth's surface
3.intrusive - thrusting inward; "an intrusive arm of the sea"
concave - curving inward
protrusive - thrusting outward

intrusive

adjective
1. interfering, disturbing, invasive, unwanted, presumptuous, uncalled-for, importunate The cameras were not an intrusive presence.
2. pushy (informal), forward, interfering, unwanted, impertinent, nosy (informal), officious, meddlesome Her bodyguards were less than gentle with intrusive journalists.
3. personal, forward, prying, impertinent, offensive, unwanted, nosy (informal) She faced intrusive questions about her sexual past.

intrusive

adjective
2. Given to intruding in other people's affairs:
Translations
intrusifintrusifsintrusiveintrusives

intrusive

[ɪnˈtruːsɪv] ADJ [reporter] → entrometido, indiscreto; [question] → indiscreto; [noise, presence] → molesto

intrusive

[ɪnˈtruːsɪv] adj [person] → importun(e), gênant(e); [thing] → gênant(e)

intrusive

adj personaufdringlich; presencestörend; government, legislationeinmischend; (Phon) → intrusiv

intrusive

[ɪnˈtruːsɪv] adjimportuno/a
References in classic literature ?
Keen Traders- Intrusive Habits - Abhorrence of Drunkenness- Anecdote of Comcomly.
I'll come back,' I said earnestly, through the soft, intrusive darkness.
And how intrusive you are, how you insist and grimace
I'm afraid you'll think me odiously intrusive, but you know I MUST have a garden--upon my honor I must
The Secretary was as far from being inquisitive or intrusive as Secretary could be, but nothing less than a complete understanding of the whole of the affairs would content him.
The sound of footsteps was not harsh, bold, decided, and intrusive, as the gait of strangers would naturally be, making authoritative entrance into a dwelling where they knew themselves unwelcome.
We can't be happy together for five minutes in the evening, but some intrusive female knocks at the door, and says, 'Oh, if you please, Miss Dora, would you step upstairs
You will kindly show the envelope of this letter to my man, Austin, when you call, as he has to take every precaution to shield me from the intrusive rascals who call themselves `journalists.
It was the woman who had been destined for Angel's life-companion by his and her parents, and whom he probably would have married but for her intrusive self.
Sir Leicester in his gallantry retires, rather declining to accept a bow from the young man as he goes out and majestically supposing him to be some shoemaker of intrusive appearance.
Through Anne's mind drifted an intrusive recollection of a funny story she had heard Philippa Gordon tell -- the story of some old man who had said very much the same thing about the world to come.
Under that hospitable roof, no intrusive hints, in the shape of flat candlesticks exhibiting themselves with ostentatious virtue on side-tables, hurried the guest to his room; no vile bell rang him ruthlessly out of bed the next morning, and insisted on his breakfasting at a given hour.