invade

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in·vade

 (ĭn-vād′)
v. in·vad·ed, in·vad·ing, in·vades
v.tr.
1. To enter by force in order to conquer or pillage: The Romans invaded Britain.
2. To enter as if by invading; overrun or crowd: Each weekend, skiers invade the mountain town.
3. To enter and proliferate in bodily tissue, as a pathogen: Bacteria have invaded the lungs.
4. To encroach or intrude on; violate: invade someone's privacy.
v.intr.
To make an invasion: The cancer had invaded deeply into his liver.

[Middle English, from Old French invader, from Latin invādere : in-, in; see in-2 + vādere, to go.]

in·vad′er n.

invade

(ɪnˈveɪd)
vb
1. (Military) to enter (a country, territory, etc) by military force
2. (tr) to occupy in large numbers; overrun; infest
3. (tr) to trespass or encroach upon (privacy, etc)
4. (tr) to enter and spread throughout, esp harmfully; pervade
5. (Botany) (of plants, esp weeds) to become established in (a place to which they are not native)
[C15: from Latin invādere, from vādere to go]
inˈvadable adj
inˈvader n

in•vade

(ɪnˈveɪd)

v. -vad•ed, -vad•ing. v.t.
1. to enter forcefully as an enemy; go into with hostile intent.
2. to enter as if to take possession: to invade a neighbor's home.
3. to enter and affect injuriously or destructively: viruses that invade the bloodstream.
4. to intrude upon: to invade someone's privacy.
5. to encroach or infringe upon: to invade the rights of citizens.
6. to penetrate; spread into or over: City dwellers invaded the suburbs.
v.i.
7. to make an invasion.
[1485–95; < Latin invādere=in- in-2 + vādere to advance, go]
in•vad′er, n.

invade


Past participle: invaded
Gerund: invading

Imperative
invade
invade
Present
I invade
you invade
he/she/it invades
we invade
you invade
they invade
Preterite
I invaded
you invaded
he/she/it invaded
we invaded
you invaded
they invaded
Present Continuous
I am invading
you are invading
he/she/it is invading
we are invading
you are invading
they are invading
Present Perfect
I have invaded
you have invaded
he/she/it has invaded
we have invaded
you have invaded
they have invaded
Past Continuous
I was invading
you were invading
he/she/it was invading
we were invading
you were invading
they were invading
Past Perfect
I had invaded
you had invaded
he/she/it had invaded
we had invaded
you had invaded
they had invaded
Future
I will invade
you will invade
he/she/it will invade
we will invade
you will invade
they will invade
Future Perfect
I will have invaded
you will have invaded
he/she/it will have invaded
we will have invaded
you will have invaded
they will have invaded
Future Continuous
I will be invading
you will be invading
he/she/it will be invading
we will be invading
you will be invading
they will be invading
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been invading
you have been invading
he/she/it has been invading
we have been invading
you have been invading
they have been invading
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been invading
you will have been invading
he/she/it will have been invading
we will have been invading
you will have been invading
they will have been invading
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been invading
you had been invading
he/she/it had been invading
we had been invading
you had been invading
they had been invading
Conditional
I would invade
you would invade
he/she/it would invade
we would invade
you would invade
they would invade
Past Conditional
I would have invaded
you would have invaded
he/she/it would have invaded
we would have invaded
you would have invaded
they would have invaded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.invade - march aggressively into another's territory by military force for the purposes of conquest and occupation; "Hitler invaded Poland on September 1, 1939"
attack, assail - launch an attack or assault on; begin hostilities or start warfare with; "Hitler attacked Poland on September 1, 1939 and started World War II"; "Serbian forces assailed Bosnian towns all week"
infest, overrun - invade in great numbers; "the roaches infested our kitchen"
2.invade - to intrude upon, infringe, encroach on, violate; "This new colleague invades my territory"; "The neighbors intrude on your privacy"
come in, enter, get in, go in, go into, move into, get into - to come or go into; "the boat entered an area of shallow marshes"
foray into, raid - enter someone else's territory and take spoils; "The pirates raided the coastal villages regularly"
3.invade - occupy in large numbers or live on a hostinvade - occupy in large numbers or live on a host; "the Kudzu plant infests much of the South and is spreading to the North"
inhabit - be present in; "sweet memories inhabit this house"
4.invade - penetrate or assault, in a harmful or injurious way; "The cancer had invaded her lungs"
interpenetrate, permeate - penetrate mutually or be interlocked; "The territories of two married people interpenetrate a lot"

invade

verb
1. attack, storm, assault, capture, occupy, seize, raid, overwhelm, violate, conquer, overrun, annex, march into, assail, descend upon, infringe on, burst in on, make inroads on In 1944 the allies invaded the Italian mainland.
2. infest, swarm, overrun, flood, infect, ravage, beset, pervade, permeate, overspread Every so often the kitchen would be invaded by ants.
3. intrude on, disturb, interrupt, violate, disrupt, encroach on, trespass on, infringe on, burst in on, obtrude on I don't want to invade your privacy, but this is my job.
4. penetrate, enter, probe, pervade, permeate She felt that he had invaded her whole subconscious.

invade

verb
To enter so as to attack, plunder, destroy, or conquer:
Translations
napadnout
invaderekrænkeoversvømme
hyökätähyökätä maahantunkeutua
napasti
ráîast inn í
侵略する
침략하다
invazijaįsiveržėlisužpuolikas
iebruktiekarotokupēt
napasti
invadera
บุกรุก
işgal etmekistilâ etmek
xâm lược

invade

[ɪnˈveɪd] VT (Mil) → invadir; [+ privacy] → invadir; [+ sb's rights] → usurpar

invade

[ɪnˈveɪd] vt
[enemy] [+ country] → envahir
[+ pitch] → envahir
The fans invaded the pitch → Les supporters envahirent le terrain.
(fig) [crowds, pests] [+ town, house] → envahir
Every so often the kitchen would be invaded by ants → À intervalles réguliers, la cuisine était envahie par les fourmis.

invade

vt (Mil) → einmarschieren in (+acc); (fig)überfallen, heimsuchen; privacyeindringen in (+acc), → stören; (Med) cell etcbefallen

invade

[ɪnˈveɪd] vt (Mil) (gen) (fig) → invadere; (privacy, sb's rights) → violare

invade

(inˈveid) verb
(of an enemy) to enter (a country etc) with an army. Britain was twice invaded by the Romans.
inˈvader noun
a person, or (sometimes in singular with the) an armed force etc, that invades. Our armies fought bravely against the invader(s).
inˈvasion (-ʒən) noun

invade

يَغْزُو napadnout invadere eindringen εισβάλλω invadir hyökätä maahan envahir napasti invadere 侵略する 침략하다 binnenvallen invadere najechać invadir вторгаться invadera บุกรุก işgal etmek xâm lược 入侵

invade

v. invadir, penetrar; atacar.

invade

vt invadir
References in classic literature ?
The room was invaded by beautiful women and dashing young men, laughing and talking together.
And as she snuggled comfortably beneath the eiderdown a sense of restfulness invaded her, such as she had not known before.
The pastoral slopes of the valley below were cloaked in lustre-leather: the rare watercourses along the road had faded from the waiting eye and ear; it seemed as if the long and dry summer had even invaded the close-set ranks of pines, and had blown a simoom breath through the densest woods, leaving its charred red ashes on every leaf and spray along the tunnelled shade.
Though refusing, from conscientious scruples, to bear arms against land invaders, yet himself had illimitably invaded the Atlantic and Pacific; and though a sworn foe to human bloodshed, yet had he in his straight-bodied coat, spilled tuns upon tuns of leviathan gore.
We descended a ticklish path in the steep side of the moraine, and invaded the glacier.
We were both of us nodding ere any one invaded our retreat, and then it was Joseph, shuffling down a wooden ladder that vanished in the roof, through a trap: the ascent to his garret, I suppose.
Doors opened, and people came and went, in the houses on either side; children by the dozen poured out on the pavement to play, and invaded the little strips of garden-ground to recover lost balls and shuttlecocks; streams of people passed backward and forward perpetually; heavy wagons piled high with goods lumbered along the road on their way to, or their way from, the railway station near; all the daily life of the district stirred with its ceaseless activity in every direction but one.
It was a matter of public knowledge, they said, that after the conquest of King William, his Norman followers, elated by so great a victory, acknowledged no law but their own wicked pleasure, and not only despoiled the conquered Saxons of their lands and their goods, but invaded the honour of their wives and of their daughters with the most unbridled license; and hence it was then common for matrons and maidens of noble families to assume the veil, and take shelter in convents, not as called thither by the vocation of God, but solely to preserve their honour from the unbridled wickedness of man.
Suddenly the dressing-room of La Sorelli, one of the principal dancers, was invaded by half-a-dozen young ladies of the ballet, who had come up from the stage after "dancing" Polyeucte.
But admit that they might be willing to help the invaded State or confederacy.
The lions he met were well-fed, perhaps, or the very boldness of the strange creature which invaded their domain so filled them with surprise that thoughts of attack were banished from their minds as they stood, round-eyed, watching his approach and his departure.
Before three o'clock the large shed was invaded by the spectators, comprising Europeans and natives, Chinese and Japanese, men, women and children, who precipitated themselves upon the narrow benches and into the boxes opposite the stage.