invalidism


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in·va·lid·ism

 (ĭn′və-lĭ-dĭz′əm)
n.
The condition of being chronically ill or disabled.

invalidism

(ˈɪnvəlɪˌdɪzəm)
n
1. the state of being an invalid, esp by reason of ill health
2. (Psychology) a state of being abnormally preoccupied with one's physical health

in•va•lid•ism

(ˈɪn və lɪˌdɪz əm)

n.
prolonged ill health.
[1785–95]

invalidism

a condition of prolonged ill health.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.invalidism - chronic ill health
health problem, ill health, unhealthiness - a state in which you are unable to function normally and without pain
Translations

invalidism

nkörperliches Leiden; (= disability)Körperbehinderung f, → Invalidität f
References in classic literature ?
Indeed her invalidism at last helped to turn the scales in Browning's favor, for the physicians had declared that Miss Barrett's life depended on removal to a warmer climate, but to this her father, a well-intentioned but strangely selfish man, absolutely refused to consent.
For detailed discussions of Phelps's literary career, invalidism, and other biographical issues, see Bennett; Coultrap-McQuin; Kelly; and Kessler, Elizabeth Stuart Phelps and "The Woman's Hour.
distrusted marriage" (Matthews 98) and viewed it as a life of imprisonment, invalidism and submission.
Medical practices created this dichotomy by promoting a cult of female invalidism and notion of hysterical women.
The Measure of Manliness contributes to this developing subfield of Victorian disability studies by putting into conversation long-standing Victorian scholarship on invalidism and illness with more recent disability theory and its investments in the social model of disability, where "sickness and disability are not fixed biological states but part of a culturally constructed continuum of ideas about the fit body" (16).
Invalidism also became a normalised aspect of femininity: the ideal woman was 'naturally' fragile and weak, suffering and confined to the house or even the bed (Appignanesi 2008, 110; Brumberg 1988, 110; Byrne 2011, 30-31; Gilbert and Gubar 1979, 53-55; Showalter 1985, 52-55; Sontag 1977, 33-34).
In a new assessment of their relationship, Anthony suggests that William McKinley's famed desire to protect his wife, coupled with the politically advantageous image of the president caring for Ida, may in some ways have reinforced Ida's invalidism in her own mind as well as the public eye and hampered her improvement.
Ableness is constructed as the norm and afforded privileged status, whereas invalidism and permanent incapacity is a product of individual-functional, charity and medical models and constructed in terms of deficiency (Oliver 2009).
Cardiac misconceptions have been associated with higher levels of emotional distress and invalidism (12), slower recovery and reduced rate of return to work (13), more re-hospitalizations (14), and poor attendance at cardiac rehabilitation (15).
With a mortality rate of around 30%, stroke remains the third leading cause of invalidism and death in industrialized countries.
17) How does a biographer attend to a subject's crimes, frailties, mental health issues, family complexities without replicating in her account limiting constructions, such as the cult of invalidism associated with the (white) Woman Subject?
After nursing his wife in her last decade of invalidism, Mike succumbed to illness and dementia.