invalidism


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in·va·lid·ism

 (ĭn′və-lĭ-dĭz′əm)
n.
The condition of being chronically ill or disabled.

invalidism

(ˈɪnvəlɪˌdɪzəm)
n
1. the state of being an invalid, esp by reason of ill health
2. (Psychology) a state of being abnormally preoccupied with one's physical health

in•va•lid•ism

(ˈɪn və lɪˌdɪz əm)

n.
prolonged ill health.
[1785–95]

invalidism

a condition of prolonged ill health.
See also: Disease and Illness
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.invalidism - chronic ill health
health problem, ill health, unhealthiness - a state in which you are unable to function normally and without pain
Translations

invalidism

nkörperliches Leiden; (= disability)Körperbehinderung f, → Invalidität f
References in classic literature ?
Indeed her invalidism at last helped to turn the scales in Browning's favor, for the physicians had declared that Miss Barrett's life depended on removal to a warmer climate, but to this her father, a well-intentioned but strangely selfish man, absolutely refused to consent.
5) Sharing Goffman's assumption that devaluation and shame commonly take over the disabled individual's self-concept, other researchers emphasize how that state of mind may also produce resignation, invalidism, and a greatly exaggerated sense of physical weakness.
Frawley's comprehensive study Invalidism and Identity in Nineteenth-Century Britain (2004) makes only passing mention of EBB as one of the noteworthy examples of invalid Victorian intellectuals and artists, it furnishes rich material for a fuller appreciation of the ways in which narratives of invalidism in the period may have shaped the poet's experience and artistic identity.
She also questions the argument that women used invalidism as rebellion, believing that this interpretation leads to a simplistic equation of women with sickness, one that obscures the more complex meaning of female invalidism in an industrial society characterized by the separation of the home and workplace that redefined gender roles.
She seems caught in a triangular conflict with the forces of her father, invalidism, and opium.
For her part, Mary Patterson retreated further into invalidism, claiming "spinal inflammation and its train of sufferings--gastric and bilious.
McCullers died in 1967 at the age of fifty, after many years of invalidism brought on by a series of strokes.
A combat-injured paraplegic, Counsell refused to accept the regime of invalidism that was still the prescribed way of regarding the possibilities for the growing number of healthy, post-hospital spinal cord-injured veterans in Canada and among the major belligerents during World War II.
Illness and invalidism in one sense insist upon the importance of the physical body.
The chronic invalidism resulting from the after-effects of heat stroke, a possible temporarily incapacitating back injury, years without teeth, feet deformed by childhood poverty: these clearly mark him as a "misfortunate" man whose misfortunes explain his deficiencies of character.
Their title derives from the entry of one of their book's most interesting contributors, William Soutar, a Scottish poet whose life was brought to a too early close, after a lengthy invalidism owing to a spinal disease, at age forty-five.
This passage shows how cleverly Beard was able not only to absolve neurasthenics from the blame accruing to invalidism, but even to paint them in a positive light as outstandingly valuable members of society who contributed more than most, notwithstanding the constitutional obstacles with which they had to contend.