invasion


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in·va·sion

 (ĭn-vā′zhən)
n.
1. The act of invading, especially the entrance of an armed force into a territory to conquer.
2. The entry into bodily tissue and subsequent proliferation of an injurious entity, such as a pathogen or tumor.
3. An intrusion or encroachment: Your reading her diary was an invasion of her privacy.

[Middle English invasioun, from Old French invasion, from Late Latin invāsiō, invāsiōn-, from invāsus, past participle of invādere, to invade; see invade.]

invasion

(ɪnˈveɪʒən)
n
1. (Military) the act of invading with armed forces
2. any encroachment or intrusion: an invasion of rats.
3. the onset or advent of something harmful, esp of a disease
4. (Pathology) pathol the spread of cancer from its point of origin into surrounding tissues
5. (Botany) the movement of plants to a new area or to an area to which they are not native

in•va•sion

(ɪnˈveɪ ʒən)

n.
1. an act or instance of invading, esp. by an army.
2. the entrance or advent of anything troublesome or harmful, as disease.
3. entrance as if to take possession or overrun: the annual invasion of tourists.
4. infringement by intrusion: invasion of privacy.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin invāsiō < Latin invād(ere) to invade]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.invasion - the act of invadinginvasion - the act of invading; the act of an army that invades for conquest or plunder
penetration, incursion - an attack that penetrates into enemy territory
inroad - an invasion or hostile attack
2.invasion - any entry into an area not previously occupiedinvasion - any entry into an area not previously occupied; "an invasion of tourists"; "an invasion of locusts"
entering, entrance - a movement into or inward
3.invasion - (pathology) the spread of pathogenic microorganisms or malignant cells to new sites in the body; "the tumor's invasion of surrounding structures"
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
spread, spreading - process or result of distributing or extending over a wide expanse of space

invasion

noun
2. flood, flow, rush, arrival, influx, convergence, inflow, incursion, inundation, inrush Seaside resorts are preparing for an invasion of tourists.
3. intrusion, breach, violation, disturbance, disruption, infringement, overstepping, infiltration, encroachment, infraction, usurpation Is reading a child's diary a gross invasion of privacy?

invasion

noun
An act of invading, especially by military forces:
Translations
غَزْو
invaze
angrebinvasion
benyomulásinvázió
innrás
invázia
napadvdor
istilâ

invasion

[ɪnˈveɪʒən] Ninvasión f
invasion forcefuerza f invasora
it would be an invasion of privacy tosería una invasión de la intimidad ...

invasion

[ɪnˈveɪʒən] n
(by enemy) [country] → invasion f; [house, town] → invasion f
an invasion of flies → une invasion de mouches
a tourist invasion → une invasion de touristes
(= intrusion) an invasion of privacy → une atteinte à la vie privée
Is reading a child's diary always an invasion of privacy? → Lire le journal d'un enfant constitue-t-il toujours une atteinte à la vie privée?

invasion

n (lit, fig)Invasion f; (of privacy etc)Eingriff m (→ of in +acc); the Viking invasionder Einfall der Wikinger; the German invasion of Polandder Einmarsch or Einfall der Deutschen in Polen

invasion

[ɪnˈveɪʒn] ninvasione f
an invasion of sb's privacy → una violazione della privacy di qn

invade

(inˈveid) verb
(of an enemy) to enter (a country etc) with an army. Britain was twice invaded by the Romans.
inˈvader noun
a person, or (sometimes in singular with the) an armed force etc, that invades. Our armies fought bravely against the invader(s).
inˈvasion (-ʒən) noun

in·va·sion

n. invasión, acto de invadir.
References in classic literature ?
Their connections were dissolved, their armies scattered, and a future invasion put entirely out of their power; yet they continued to practise mischief secretly upon the inhabitants, in the exposed parts of the country.
And as upon the invasion of their valleys, the frosty Swiss have retreated to their mountains; so, hunted from the savannas and glades of the middle seas, the whale-bone whales can at last resort to their Polar citadels, and diving under the ultimate glassy barriers and walls there, come up among icy fields and floes; and in a charmed circle of everlasting December, bid defiance to all pursuit from man.
Old Dinah, the head cook, and principal of all rule and authority in the kitchen department, was filled with wrath at what she considered an invasion of privilege.
He had early dropped again into his dream of a grand invasion of Gaul with the whole strength of his kingdom at his back, and the afternoon had slipped away without his ever coming to himself again.
I could almost wish the invasion might happen," murmured one of the gentlemen, "to give me the happiness of offering the refuge.
Now, in the midst of these intestine disquiets, we are threatened with an invasion from the island of Blefuscu, which is the other great empire of the universe, almost as large and powerful as this of his majesty.
The barbarian chieftain, who defended his country against the Roman invasion, driven to the remotest extremity of Britain, and stimulating his followers to battle by all that has power of persuasion upon the human heart, concluded his persuasion by an appeal to these irresistible feelings: "Think of your forefathers and of your posterity.
Resolved: that the maintenance inviolate of the rights of the States, and especially the right of each State to order and control its own domestic institutions according to its own judgment exclusively, is essential to that balance of power on which the perfection and endurance of our political fabric depend, and we denounce the lawless invasion by armed force of the soil of any State or Territory, no matter under what pretext, as among the gravest of crimes.
I ween that King Harry had never watched the invasion of an enemy with more anxiety than he now felt.
The citizens of the States interested would clamour; foreign powers would urge for the satisfaction of their just demands, and the peace of the States would be hazarded to the double contingency of external invasion and internal contention.
A protection against invasion is due from every society to the parts composing it.
But when Mariette made an invasion of the market, and bought all the best things; when Jacquelin went to the principal upholsterer in Alencon, two doors from the church, in search of a bed,--there was matter for the gravest conjectures.