invective


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in·vec·tive

 (ĭn-vĕk′tĭv)
n.
1. Denunciatory or abusive language; vituperation: an orator known for his abundant use of invective.
2. A denunciatory or abusive expression or discourse: shouted invectives at the umpire.

[From Middle English invectif, denunciatory, from Old French, from Late Latin invectīvus, reproachful, abusive, from Latin invectus, past participle of invehī, to inveigh against; see inveigh.]

in·vec′tive adj.
in·vec′tive·ly adv.
in·vec′tive·ness n.

invective

(ɪnˈvɛktɪv)
n
vehement accusation or denunciation, esp of a bitterly abusive or sarcastic kind
adj
characterized by or using abusive language, bitter sarcasm, etc
[C15: from Late Latin invectīvus reproachful, scolding, from Latin invectus carried in; see inveigh]
inˈvectively adv
inˈvectiveness n

in•vec•tive

(ɪnˈvɛk tɪv)

n.
1. vehement denunciation, censure, or reproach; vituperation.
2. an insulting or abusive word or expression.
adj.
3. vituperative; denunciatory; censoriously abusive.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin invectīvus abusive, derivative of Latin invectus, past participle of invehī inveigh]
in•vec′tive•ly, adv.
in•vec′tive•ness, n.
syn: See abuse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.invective - abusive or venomous language used to express blame or censure or bitter deep-seated ill willinvective - abusive or venomous language used to express blame or censure or bitter deep-seated ill will
contumely, insult, revilement, vilification, abuse - a rude expression intended to offend or hurt; "when a student made a stupid mistake he spared them no abuse"; "they yelled insults at the visiting team"

invective

noun abuse, censure, tirade, reproach, berating, denunciation, diatribe, vilification, tongue-lashing, billingsgate, vituperation, castigation, obloquy, contumely, philippic(s), revilement A woman had hurled racist invective at the family.

invective

nounadjective
Of, relating to, or characterized by verbal abuse:
Translations

invective

[ɪnˈvektɪv] N (= accusation) → invectiva f; (= abuse) → improperios mpl, palabras fpl fuertes

invective

[ɪnˈvɛktɪv] ninvective f

invective

nBeschimpfungen pl (→ against +gen), → Schmähungen pl (geh)(against gegen), Invektiven pl (liter)

invective

[ɪnˈvɛktɪv] ninvettiva
a stream of invective → una sfilza d'ingiurie, una sequela di improperi
References in classic literature ?
to prevent it from becoming merely a forum for invective.
The boy, patterning his conduct after that of his preceptor, unstoppered the vials of his invective upon the head of the enemy, until in realization of the futility of words as weapons he bethought himself of something heavier to hurl.
Bartle had become so excited and angry in the course of his invective that he had forgotten his supper, and only used the knife for the purpose of rapping the table with the haft.
Lady Bertram listened without much interest to this sort of invective.
I was in a great hurry to depart, but of course I sat down, pulled out a copy of L'Opinion Nationale, and fell to reading an extraordinary piece of invective against Russia which it happened to contain.
From behind the shaking curtains came one volley of invective.
What was meant by the invective against him who had no music in his soul?
The opening was a sound piece of slashing invective about the evil secrets of princes, and despair in the high places of the earth.
Strickland employed not the rapier of sarcasm but the bludgeon of invective.
He had the choler of the obese, easily roused and as easily calmed, and his boys soon discovered that there was much kindliness beneath the invective with which he constantly assailed them.
Whereupon he turned and left the captain with the same indifferent ease that was habitual with him, and which was more surely calculated to raise the ire of a man of Billings' class than a torrent of invective.
But the idea of this dried-up pedant, this elaborator of small explanations about as important as the surplus stock of false antiquities kept in a vendor's back chamber, having first got this adorable young creature to marry him, and then passing his honeymoon away from her, groping after his mouldy futilities (Will was given to hyperbole)-- this sudden picture stirred him with a sort of comic disgust: he was divided between the impulse to laugh aloud and the equally unseasonable impulse to burst into scornful invective.