invective

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in·vec·tive

 (ĭn-vĕk′tĭv)
n.
1. Denunciatory or abusive language; vituperation: an orator known for his abundant use of invective.
2. A denunciatory or abusive expression or discourse: shouted invectives at the umpire.

[From Middle English invectif, denunciatory, from Old French, from Late Latin invectīvus, reproachful, abusive, from Latin invectus, past participle of invehī, to inveigh against; see inveigh.]

in·vec′tive adj.
in·vec′tive·ly adv.
in·vec′tive·ness n.

invective

(ɪnˈvɛktɪv)
n
vehement accusation or denunciation, esp of a bitterly abusive or sarcastic kind
adj
characterized by or using abusive language, bitter sarcasm, etc
[C15: from Late Latin invectīvus reproachful, scolding, from Latin invectus carried in; see inveigh]
inˈvectively adv
inˈvectiveness n

in•vec•tive

(ɪnˈvɛk tɪv)

n.
1. vehement denunciation, censure, or reproach; vituperation.
2. an insulting or abusive word or expression.
adj.
3. vituperative; denunciatory; censoriously abusive.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin invectīvus abusive, derivative of Latin invectus, past participle of invehī inveigh]
in•vec′tive•ly, adv.
in•vec′tive•ness, n.
syn: See abuse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.invective - abusive or venomous language used to express blame or censure or bitter deep-seated ill willinvective - abusive or venomous language used to express blame or censure or bitter deep-seated ill will
contumely, insult, revilement, vilification, abuse - a rude expression intended to offend or hurt; "when a student made a stupid mistake he spared them no abuse"; "they yelled insults at the visiting team"

invective

noun abuse, censure, tirade, reproach, berating, denunciation, diatribe, vilification, tongue-lashing, billingsgate, vituperation, castigation, obloquy, contumely, philippic(s), revilement A woman had hurled racist invective at the family.

invective

nounadjective
Of, relating to, or characterized by verbal abuse:
Translations

invective

[ɪnˈvektɪv] N (= accusation) → invectiva f; (= abuse) → improperios mpl, palabras fpl fuertes

invective

[ɪnˈvɛktɪv] ninvective f

invective

nBeschimpfungen pl (→ against +gen), → Schmähungen pl (geh)(against gegen), Invektiven pl (liter)

invective

[ɪnˈvɛktɪv] ninvettiva
a stream of invective → una sfilza d'ingiurie, una sequela di improperi
References in classic literature ?
She cried day and night, and was, from excess of sorrow, less skilful and alert in her ministrations of her mistress than usual, which drew down a constant storm of invectives on her defenceless head.
Dick represented the Government or the Opposition (as the case might be), and Traddles, with the assistance of Enfield's Speakers, or a volume of parliamentary orations, thundered astonishing invectives against them.
To judge from the conduct of the opposite parties, we shall be led to conclude that they will mutually hope to evince the justness of their opinions, and to increase the number of their converts by the loudness of their declamations and the bitterness of their invectives.
She remained nearly always in her second-floor chamber, shivering in her chair, or stretched languid and feeble on her bed, while her husband kept his daily watch at the door -- a duty he performed with so much the greater willingness, as it saved him the necessity of listening to the endless plaints and murmurs of his helpmate, who never saw him without breaking out into bitter invectives against fate; to all of which her husband would calmly return an unvarying reply, in these philosophic words: --
Bennet, to whose apartment they all repaired, after a few minutes' conversation together, received them exactly as might be expected; with tears and lamentations of regret, invectives against the villainous conduct of Wickham, and complaints of her own sufferings and ill-usage; blaming everybody but the person to whose ill-judging indulgence the errors of her daughter must principally be owing.
It had then been given up to the women and boys; who had paraded it up and down the village with shouts and chants and antic dances; occasionally saluting it with all kinds of taunts, invectives, and revilings.
At one moment reclining sideways upon the mat, and leaning calmly upon his bended arm, he related circumstantially the aggressions of the French--their hostile visits to the surrounding bays, enumerating each one in succession--Happar, Puerka, Nukuheva, Tior,--and then starting to his feet and precipitating himself forward with clenched hands and a countenance distorted with passion, he poured out a tide of invectives.
Benjamin ceased thumbing his money, and raised his head at the instant that Hiram, who was thrown off his guard by the invectives of the hunter, unluckily trusted his person within reach of the steward, who grasped one of his legs with a hand that had the grip of a vise, and whirled the magistrate from his feet, before he had either time to collect his senses or to exercise the strength he did really possess.
As soon as the visitors had crossed the low dark hall, and entered the narrow reception-room, furnished with half a dozen cane chairs, and two small card-tables, Madame Terentieff, in the shrill tones habitual to her, continued her stream of invectives.
He occasionally broke forth into sentences composed of invectives joined together in a long string.
And lo, there spurted into his face all at once a cry of pain, and two curses and twenty bad invectives, so that in his fright he raised his stick and also struck the trodden one.
Horser, with a stream of magnificent invectives, obeyed the summons.