invidious

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Related to invidiousness: enviousness

in·vid·i·ous

 (ĭn-vĭd′ē-əs)
adj.
1. Tending to rouse ill will, animosity, or resentment: invidious accusations.
2. Offensive and unfair: invidious distinctions.
3. Archaic Envious.

[Latin invidiōsus, envious, hostile, from invidia, envy; see envy.]

in·vid′i·ous·ly adv.

invidious

(ɪnˈvɪdɪəs)
adj
1. incurring or tending to arouse resentment, unpopularity, etc: an invidious task.
2. (of comparisons or distinctions) unfairly or offensively discriminating
3. obsolete grudging; envious
[C17: from Latin invidiōsus full of envy, from invidia envy]
inˈvidiously adv
inˈvidiousness n

in•vid•i•ous

(ɪnˈvɪd i əs)

adj.
1. calculated to create ill will; causing resentment or envy.
2. offensively or unfairly discriminating; injurious: invidious comparisons.
3. Obs. envious.
[1600–10; < Latin invidiōsus, derivative of invidi(a) envy]
in•vid′i•ous•ly, adv.
in•vid′i•ous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.invidious - containing or implying a slight or showing prejudice; "discriminatory attitudes and practices"; "invidious comparisons"
unfavorable, unfavourable - not encouraging or approving or pleasing; "unfavorable conditions"; "an unfavorable comparison"; "unfavorable comments", "unfavorable impression"

invidious

adjective
1. undesirable, unpleasant, hateful, thankless He's in the invidious position of having to break the bad news.
undesirable pleasant, desirable, pleasing
2. unfair, unjust, unjustified, inequitable It is invidious to make a selection.

invidious

adjective
1. Damaging to the reputation:
Law: libelous.
2. Resentfully or painfully desirous of another's advantages:
Translations

invidious

[ɪnˈvɪdɪəs] ADJ [job, task] → odioso, ingrato; [comparison] → injusto
I find myself in an invidious positionme encuentro en una situación ingrata
it would be invidious to mention namessería inapropiado mencionar nombres

invidious

[ɪnˈvɪdiəs] adj
[comparison] → indu(e)
We should guard against invidious comparisons with Scotland Yard → Nous devrions nous garder de toute comparaison indue avec Scotland Yard.
[task] → peu enviable
(= awkward) [position] → peu enviable
to be put in an invidious position → être placé dans une position peu enviable

invidious

adj remarkgehässig, boshaft; task, positionunerfreulich, unangenehm; behaviour, conductgemein; distinctions, comparison, discriminationungerecht; it would be invidious to …es wäre ungerecht, zu …

invidious

[ɪnˈvɪdɪəs] adj (comparison) → ingiusto/a; (task) → poco invidiabile, antipatico/a; (choice) → imbarazzante, difficile
References in periodicals archive ?
Without defending the invidiousness of competition, one is tempted to question whether novelists merit St.
783, 797 (1973) ("'The fact that district boundaries may have been drawn in a way that minimizes the number of contests between present incumbents does not in and of itself establish invidiousness.
The Court buttressed these normative claims of inherent invidiousness with related claims of "consistency" (i.
Despite the ubiquitous critical belief in Jonson's personal invidiousness, Lynn Meskill rightly claims that there has been no thorough consideration of how envy functions within his writings.
98) Intent is understood as crucial to this inquiry; equal protection violations arise only when the government has classified '"because of,' not merely 'in spite of,'" (99) a certain trait, whose inherent invidiousness or lack thereof determines the proper level of scrutiny.
16) The periodicals they have advocated are, however, open to the same criticism of triviality, invidiousness, and even, at times, salaciousness as the tabloids they pillory.
In both the United States and the rest of the world, the history of status-based restrictions of the right to contract has been laced with invidiousness and an attempt to maintain a class of citizens below that of the ruling class.
Montpellier are doing well in their domestic league, compared to the Blues who are in a mess, and the mounting injury list only adds to the invidiousness of Phil Davies' situation.
86) Moreover, the religious overtones of sanctification are appropriate because realist insights have taught us that a considerable leap of faith is required to believe that Supreme Court constitutional adjudication could genuinely turn discrimination into equality, and detach cultural discrimination from the invidiousness that it often reflects.
The strange vitality of this phenomenal world is captured in these statements about the impact of the mountains on the female observer who both loves and fears them: "Out of the mountains came two breaths of influence: the breath of the curious, frenzied energy, that took away one's intelligence as alcohol or any other stimulus does: and then the most strange invidiousness that ate away the soul" (144).
First, he posits the invidiousness of slavery by establishing the capture, rendition, and new-world enslavement of Toussaint's father to be arbitrary, immoral (according to the laws of God), and indefensible (according to the laws of men): "Le pere de Toussaint Louverture, second fils du roi, fut fait prisonnier dans une guerre, et vendu selon la coutume barbare des Africains.
The formal label under which an equal protection claim is reviewed is less important than careful identification of the constitutional and societal importance of the interest adversely affected and the recognized invidiousness of the basis upon which the particular classification is drawn.