invited


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in·vite

 (ĭn-vīt′)
tr.v. in·vit·ed, in·vit·ing, in·vites
1. To ask for the presence or participation of: invite friends to dinner; invite writers to a conference.
2. To request formally: invited us to be seated.
3. To welcome; encourage: invite questions from the audience.
4. To tend to bring on; provoke: "Divisions at home would invite dangers from abroad" (John Jay).
5. To entice; tempt.
n. (ĭn′vīt′) Informal
An invitation.

[French inviter, from Old French, from Latin invītāre; see weiə- in Indo-European roots.]

invited

(ɪnˈvaɪtɪd)
adj
having been asked to attend
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Roderigo produced a rope ladder, with five steps to it, threw up one end, and invited Zara to descend.
On the summer evening, after the talk before the hotel, Tom Hard took the girl child to the house of a relative where she had been invited to spend the night.
In that language he knew so well how to assume, he diverted his comrades from their instant purpose, and invited them to prolong the misery of their victims.
At the head of the stairs, however, she met Hepzibah, who, it being still early, invited her into a room which she would probably have called her boudoir, had her education embraced any such French phrase.
Forth peeped at her, out of the pool, with dark, glistening curls around her head, and an elf-smile in her eyes, the image of a little maid whom Pearl, having no other playmate, invited to take her hand and run a race with her.
By certain signs and symptoms, I thought he seemed anxious for me to join him; but well knowing what was to follow, I deliberated a moment whether, in case he invited me, I would comply or otherwise.
For being at Tranque, years ago, when attached to the trading-ship Dey of Algiers, I was invited to spend part of the Arsacidean holidays with the lord of Tranque, at his retired palm villa at Pupella; a sea-side glen not very far distant from what our sailors called Bamboo-Town, his capital.
He was very friendly and polite to John, and after giving us a slight look he called a groom to take us to our boxes, and invited John to take some refreshment.
There was no time during the festivities which ensued when there were not groups of onlookers in the doorways and the corners; and if any one of these onlookers came sufficiently close, or looked sufficiently hungry, a chair was offered him, and he was invited to the feast.
Why, I invited him; I had some accounts with him," said Shelby.
They were too much hardened by lifelong everyday familiar- ity with slavery to notice that there was anything else in the exhibition that invited comment.
In Frankfort at the Romer was a great mask-ball, at the coronation festival, and in the illuminated saloon, the clanging music invited to dance, and splendidly appeared the rich toilets and charms of the ladies, and the festively costumed Princes and Knights.