involute

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involute
The parametric equations of an involute of a circle are
x = r cos θ + r θ sin θ,
y = r sin θ - r θ cos θ.

in·vo·lute

 (ĭn′və-lo͞ot′)
adj.
1. Intricate; complex.
2.
a. Botany Having the margins rolled inward.
b. Zoology Having whorls that enclose and obscure earlier whorls. Used of a gastropod shell.
intr.v. in·vo·lut·ed, in·vo·lut·ing, in·vo·lutes
To curl inward.
n.
The curve traced by a point as if it were on a taut string being unwound from another curve.

[Latin involūtus, past participle of involvere, to enwrap; see involve.]

in′vo·lute′ly adv.

involute

adj
1. complex, intricate, or involved
2. (Botany) botany (esp of petals, leaves, etc, in bud) having margins that are rolled inwards
3. (Zoology) (of certain shells) closely coiled so that the axis is obscured
n
(Mathematics) geometry the curve described by the free end of a thread as it is wound around another curve, the evolute, such that its normals are tangential to the evolute. See also evolute
vb
(intr) to become involute
[C17: from Latin involūtus, from involvere; see involve]
ˈinvoˌlutely adv
ˌinvoˈlutedly adv

in•vo•lute

(adj., n. ˈɪn vəˌlut; v. ˌɪn vəˈlut)

adj., n., v. -lut•ed, -lut•ing. adj.
1. intricate; complex.
2. curled or curved inward or spirally: a gear with involute teeth.
3. rolled inward from the edge, as a leaf.
4. (of shells) having the whorls closely wound.
n.
5. Geom. any curve of which a given curve is the evolute.
v.i.
6. to become involute.
7. to return to a normal shape, size, or state.
[1655–65; < Latin involūtus, past participle of involvere; see involve]
in′vo•lute`ly, adv.

involute


Past participle: involuted
Gerund: involuting

Imperative
involute
involute
Present
I involute
you involute
he/she/it involutes
we involute
you involute
they involute
Preterite
I involuted
you involuted
he/she/it involuted
we involuted
you involuted
they involuted
Present Continuous
I am involuting
you are involuting
he/she/it is involuting
we are involuting
you are involuting
they are involuting
Present Perfect
I have involuted
you have involuted
he/she/it has involuted
we have involuted
you have involuted
they have involuted
Past Continuous
I was involuting
you were involuting
he/she/it was involuting
we were involuting
you were involuting
they were involuting
Past Perfect
I had involuted
you had involuted
he/she/it had involuted
we had involuted
you had involuted
they had involuted
Future
I will involute
you will involute
he/she/it will involute
we will involute
you will involute
they will involute
Future Perfect
I will have involuted
you will have involuted
he/she/it will have involuted
we will have involuted
you will have involuted
they will have involuted
Future Continuous
I will be involuting
you will be involuting
he/she/it will be involuting
we will be involuting
you will be involuting
they will be involuting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been involuting
you have been involuting
he/she/it has been involuting
we have been involuting
you have been involuting
they have been involuting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been involuting
you will have been involuting
he/she/it will have been involuting
we will have been involuting
you will have been involuting
they will have been involuting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been involuting
you had been involuting
he/she/it had been involuting
we had been involuting
you had been involuting
they had been involuting
Conditional
I would involute
you would involute
he/she/it would involute
we would involute
you would involute
they would involute
Past Conditional
I would have involuted
you would have involuted
he/she/it would have involuted
we would have involuted
you would have involuted
they would have involuted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.involute - especially of petals or leaves in bud; having margins rolled inward
phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
coiled - curled or wound (especially in concentric rings or spirals); "a coiled snake ready to strike"; "the rope lay coiled on the deck"
2.involute - (of some shells) closely coiled so that the axis is obscured
coiled - curled or wound (especially in concentric rings or spirals); "a coiled snake ready to strike"; "the rope lay coiled on the deck"

involute

adjective
Translations

involute

adj (liter: = complex) → verwickelt
References in classic literature ?
The possible moves being not only manifold but involute, the chances of such oversights are multiplied; and in nine cases out of ten it is the more concentrative rather than the more acute player who conquers.
The sciatic artery normally involutes by the third month as the femoral artery develops.
Mammography alone, when used on the appropriate person, is quite good" he continues, "but only once their breast tissue involutes below 50% fibroglandular tissue by volume.
When the radius of involutes base circle and the offset circle of cam are equal, the cam profile can lead zero pressure angle with the roller reducing the stress on guide sleeve.
2006) described the scroll compressor geometry based on the parametric equations for the circle involutes, in order to exploit the symmetry of the compressor.
The thymus commonly involutes during periods of stress.
Where Hallucination diverges from Fuller's other recent work is in the intensity with which it involutes and impacts its particles of perception and reflection.
Perilesional edema begins to subside gradually; the cyst involutes and the contents begin to mineralize.
The involutes curves are difficult to machine, and you would throw away or try to recover a whole lot of scrap metal.
2002), Direct Gear Design for SPUR and Helical Involutes Gears Technology, September /October, p.
Boyer discovered involutes while trying to build a more accurate clock [1].
In children, adenotonsillar hypertrophy is a significant factor (21), and it is known that adenotonsillar tissue is at its largest in the first few years of life and then involutes by adolescence and into adulthood.