iodophor

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Related to iodophors: hypochlorites

i·o·do·phor

 (ī-ō′də-fôr′)
n.
A substance consisting of iodine and a solubilizing agent that releases free iodine when in solution.

iodophor

(ˈaɪəʊdəˌfɔː)
n
a substance in which iodine is combined with an agent that renders it soluble, making a solution suitable for use as a disinfectant
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact the iodine status of the UK improved due to the use of iodophors [added iodine] in the milk industry and the practice of feeding cattle cake to cows in winter.
Iodophors, hypochlorite, quaternary ammonium compounds are common sanitizers used for cleaning of many dairy utensils and equipment.
Types of antimicrobial soaps include products that contain triclosan, chlorhexidine, iodine and iodophors or chloroxylenol.
There are four standard types or classifications: chlorine-based products, phenolic solutions (water- or alcohol-based), iodophors and quaternary compounds.
While a number of disinfectants such as alcohols, hypochlorites, chlorohexidine, iodophors, hydrogen peroxide, and phenolics are used in healthcare facilities, many LTC facilities choose quaternary ammonium compounds (quats) to destroy, inhibit, or prevent growth of microbes on surfaces in patient/resident rooms.
Iodine and iodophors are effective against Gram-positive, Gram-negative and certain spore-forming bacteria, mycobacteria, viruses and fungi (3,6).
The physical action of washing and rinsing hands water such circumstances is recommended because alcohols, chlorhexidine, iodophors, and other antiseptic agents have poor activity against spores.
Phenolic compounds, iodophors, nitrogen compounds, and organometallics will remain the largest product categories, accounting for three-quarters of the demand by 2009.
Phenolic compounds will be the largest single type, with iodophors rating next largest based on their growing use in surface disinfectants and as additives for paints and coatings.
Iodophors will be the next largest type, due to their broad spectrum germicidal activity, compatibility with a variety of cleaning formulations, and synergistic action in disinfectant blends containing more than one active ingredient or an active ingredient mixed with a commodity such as isopropanol.
Due to expanding applications in low-solvent coatings and hard surface cleaners, iodophors will record above-average growth and organometallics will comprise almost 45% of all disinfectants and antimicrobials in 2007.