irascible


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i·ras·ci·ble

 (ĭ-răs′ə-bəl, ī-răs′-)
adj.
1. Prone to outbursts of temper; easily angered.
2. Characterized by or resulting from anger.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin īrāscibilis, from Latin īrāscī, to be angry, from īra, anger; see eis- in Indo-European roots.]

i·ras′ci·bil′i·ty, i·ras′ci·ble·ness n.
i·ras′ci·bly adv.

irascible

(ɪˈræsɪbəl)
adj
1. easily angered; irritable
2. showing irritability: an irascible action.
[C16: from Late Latin īrascibilis, from Latin īra anger]
iˌrasciˈbility, iˈrascibleness n
iˈrascibly adv

i•ras•ci•ble

(ɪˈræs ə bəl)

adj.
1. easily provoked to anger; very irritable.
2. characterized or produced by anger: an irascible response.
[1350–1400; Middle English irascibel < Late Latin īrāscibilis, derivative of Latin īrāsc(ī) to grow angry]
i•ras`ci•bil′i•ty, i•ras′ci•ble•ness, n.
i•ras′ci•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.irascible - quickly aroused to anger; "a hotheaded commander"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition
2.irascible - characterized by anger; "a choleric outburst"; "an irascible response"
angry - feeling or showing anger; "angry at the weather"; "angry customers"; "an angry silence"; "sending angry letters to the papers"

irascible

adjective bad-tempered, cross, irritable, crabbed, touchy, cantankerous, peppery, tetchy, ratty (Brit. & N.Z. informal), testy, chippy (informal), short-tempered, hot-tempered, quick-tempered, choleric, narky (Brit. slang) He had an irascible temper.

irascible

adjective
Translations
سَريع الغَضَب
popudlivý
hidsig
ärrituv
uppstökkur
greit supykstantis
viegli aizkaitināms
asabîkolay kızansinirli

irascible

[ɪˈræsɪbl] ADJirascible, colérico

irascible

[ɪˈræsɪbəl] adjirascible

irascible

adjreizbar, erregbar, jähzornig; temperament alsojähzornig, heftig, aufbrausend

irascible

[ɪˈræsɪbl] adjirascibile

irascible

(iˈrӕsibl) adjective
irritable; easily made angry.
iˈrascibly adverb
iˌrasciˈbility noun

irascible

a. irascible, que se irrita fácilmente.
References in classic literature ?
This did not suit Jo at all, but she accepted the place since nothing better appeared and, to every one's surprise, got on remarkably well with her irascible relative.
Like some poor devils ashore that happen to know an irascible great man, they make distant unobtrusive salutations to him in the street, lest if they pursued the acquaintance further, they might receive a summary thump for their presumption.
He was a singularly irascible man; any little thing would disturb his temper.
He could not understand her sad face or the tears that rolled silently down her cheeks from time to time; for Hannah had always represented her aunt Miranda as an irascible, parsimonious old woman, who would be no loss to the world whenever she should elect to disappear from it.
But do you see, Professor," replied our irascible companion, "that we shall absolutely die of hunger in this iron cage?
So too the poet, in representing men who are irascible or indolent, or have other defects of character, should preserve the type and yet ennoble it.
I mean such conditions as insanity, irascibility, and so on: for people are said to be mad or irascible in virtue of these.
Hot-headed and impatient at all times, he had been rendered irascible by the fatigues of the journey, and the condition of his feet, which were chafed and sore.
He runs after us, a puffing, red-faced, irascible figure.
In a few minutes we had the house congested with dishevelled domestics, irascible doctors, and arbitrary minions of the law.
Everywhere, all over the world, the historian,of the early twentieth century finds the same thing, the flow and rearrangement of human affairs inextricably entangled by the old areas, the old prejudices and a sort of heated irascible stupidity, and everywhere congested nations in inconvenient areas, slopping population and produce into each other, annoying each other with tariffs, and every possible commercial vexation, and threatening each other with navies and armies that grew every year more portentous.
Wrench was a small, neat, bilious man, with a well-dressed wig: he had a laborious practice, an irascible temper, a lymphatic wife and seven children; and he was already rather late before setting out on a four-miles drive to meet Dr.