irascible


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i·ras·ci·ble

 (ĭ-răs′ə-bəl, ī-răs′-)
adj.
1. Prone to outbursts of temper; easily angered.
2. Characterized by or resulting from anger.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin īrāscibilis, from Latin īrāscī, to be angry, from īra, anger; see eis- in Indo-European roots.]

i·ras′ci·bil′i·ty, i·ras′ci·ble·ness n.
i·ras′ci·bly adv.

irascible

(ɪˈræsɪbəl)
adj
1. easily angered; irritable
2. showing irritability: an irascible action.
[C16: from Late Latin īrascibilis, from Latin īra anger]
iˌrasciˈbility iˈrascibleness n iˈrascibly adv

i•ras•ci•ble

(ɪˈr?s ə bəl)

adj.
1. easily provoked to anger; very irritable.
2. characterized or produced by anger: an irascible response.
[1350–1400; Middle English irascibel < Late Latin īrāscibilis, derivative of Latin īrāsc(ī) to grow angry]
i•ras`ci•bil′i•ty, i•ras′ci•ble•ness, n.
i•ras′ci•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.irascible - quickly aroused to anger; "a hotheaded commander"
ill-natured - having an irritable and unpleasant disposition
2.irascible - characterized by anger; "a choleric outburst"; "an irascible response"
angry - feeling or showing anger; "angry at the weather"; "angry customers"; "an angry silence"; "sending angry letters to the papers"

irascible

adjective bad-tempered, cross, irritable, crabbed, touchy, cantankerous, peppery, tetchy, ratty (Brit. & N.Z. informal), testy, chippy (informal), short-tempered, hot-tempered, quick-tempered, choleric, narky (Brit. slang) He had an irascible temper.
Translations

irascible

[ɪˈræsɪbl] ADJirascible, colerico

irascible

[ɪˈræsɪbəl] adjirascible

irascible

adjreizbar, erregbar, jahzornig; temperament alsojahzornig, heftig, aufbrausend

irascible

[ɪˈræsɪbl] adjirascibile

irascible

(iˈrӕsibl) adjective
irritable; easily made angry.
iˈrascibly adverb
iˌrasciˈbility noun

irascible

a. irascible, que se irrita fácilmente.
References in classic literature ?
So too the poet, in representing men who are irascible or indolent, or have other defects of character, should preserve the type and yet ennoble it.
The principles of definition, the law of contradiction, the fallacy of arguing in a circle, the distinction between the essence and accidents of a thing or notion, between means and ends, between causes and conditions; also the division of the mind into the rational, concupiscent, and irascible elements, or of pleasures and desires into necessary and unnecessary-- these and other great forms of thought are all of them to be found in the Republic, and were probably first invented by Plato.
Black George was, in the main, a peaceable kind of fellow, and nothing choleric nor rash; yet did he bear about him something of what the antients called the irascible, and which his wife, if she had been endowed with much wisdom, would have feared.