ire


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ire

 (īr)
n.
Anger; wrath. See Synonyms at anger.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin īra; see eis- in Indo-European roots.]

ire

(aɪə)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) literary anger; wrath
[C13: from Old French, from Latin īra]
ˈireful adj
ˈirefully adv
ˈirefulness n
ˈireless adj

ire

(aɪər)

n.
intense anger; wrath.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French < Latin īra anger]
ire′ful, adj.
ire′ful•ly, adv.
ire′ful•ness, n.

Ire.

Ireland.

ire

, rage, fury - Ire suggests greater intensity than anger, rage suggests loss of self-control, and fury is destructive rage verging on madness.
See also related terms for madness.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ire - a strong emotionire - a strong emotion; a feeling that is oriented toward some real or supposed grievance
emotion - any strong feeling
fury, rage, madness - a feeling of intense anger; "hell hath no fury like a woman scorned"; "his face turned red with rage"
enragement, infuriation - a feeling of intense anger
umbrage, offense, offence - a feeling of anger caused by being offended; "he took offence at my question"
indignation, outrage - a feeling of righteous anger
huffiness - a passing state of anger and resentment
hackles, dander - a feeling of anger and animosity; "having one's hackles or dander up"
bad temper, ill temper - a persisting angry mood
vexation, annoyance, chafe - anger produced by some annoying irritation
2.ire - belligerence aroused by a real or supposed wrong (personified as one of the deadly sins)ire - belligerence aroused by a real or supposed wrong (personified as one of the deadly sins)
deadly sin, mortal sin - an unpardonable sin entailing a total loss of grace; "theologians list seven mortal sins"

ire

noun anger, rage, fury, wrath, passion, indignation, annoyance, displeasure, exasperation, choler Their ire was directed mainly at the two instigators.

ire

noun
1. Violent or unrestrained anger:
2. A strong feeling of displeasure or hostility:
Translations
viha

ire

[aɪəʳ] N (liter) → ira f, cólera f
to rouse sb's ireprovocar la ira de algn

ire

[ˈaɪər] n (= wrath, fury) → ire f

ire

n (liter)Zorn m
References in classic literature ?
He endeavored, in a general way, to express a particular disapproval, and only succeeded in arousing the ire and opposition of his father-in-law.
My habitual mood of humiliation, self-doubt, forlorn depression, fell damp on the embers of my decaying ire.
But what if he our Conquerour, (whom I now Of force believe Almighty, since no less Then such could hav orepow'rd such force as ours) Have left us this our spirit and strength intire Strongly to suffer and support our pains, That we may so suffice his vengeful ire, Or do him mightier service as his thralls By right of Warr, what e're his business be Here in the heart of Hell to work in Fire, Or do his Errands in the gloomy Deep; What can it then avail though yet we feel Strength undiminisht, or eternal being To undergo eternal punishment?
That will I keep," said the King, holding in check his ire by a mighty effort.
The fellow knew his master's plans sufficiently well to understand that he had done something to arouse the ire of the Big Bwana and that it would fare ill with them all if they were overtaken in Big Bwana's country.
He paraded his Musketeers before the Cardinal Armand Duplessis with an insolent air which made the gray moustache of his Eminence curl with ire.
I could not suppress a low laugh; there was ire in her glance and defiance in her attitude.
He stalked in front of the ladies, and seated himself at the feet of his mistress, growling louder than before, and occasionally giving vent to his ire by a short, surly barking.
Hunt, roused the ire of M'Lellan; who, calling to mind old grievances, began to look round for his rifle, as if he really intended to carry his threat into execution and shoot him on the spot; and it was with some difficulty that Mr.
He felt that he needed to pour out his ire and he took the road to her house.
The breakfast-room was gay with company; and she was named to them by the general as the friend of his daughter, in a complimentary style, which so well concealed his resentful ire, as to make her feel secure at least of life for the present.
Whereupon he turned and left the captain with the same indifferent ease that was habitual with him, and which was more surely calculated to raise the ire of a man of Billings' class than a torrent of invective.