ironwork


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to ironwork: wrought iron

i·ron·work

 (ī′ərn-wûrk′)
n.
Work in iron, such as gratings and rails.

ironwork

(ˈaɪənˌwɜːk)
n
1. (Crafts) work done in iron, esp decorative work
2. (Crafts) the craft or practice of working in iron

i•ron•work

(ˈaɪ ərnˌwɜrk)

n.
objects or parts of objects made of iron: ornamental ironwork.
[1375–1425]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ironwork - work made of iron (gratings or rails or railings etc)ironwork - work made of iron (gratings or rails or railings etc); "the houses had much ornamental ironwork"
piece of work, work - a product produced or accomplished through the effort or activity or agency of a person or thing; "it is not regarded as one of his more memorable works"; "the symphony was hailed as an ingenious work"; "he was indebted to the pioneering work of John Dewey"; "the work of an active imagination"; "erosion is the work of wind or water over time"
Translations

ironwork

[ˈaɪənwɜːk] N (on piece of furniture) → herraje m; (on building) → obra f de hierro
References in classic literature ?
Then I came to a flight of steps, and then to a blind door, secured by a latch of elaborate Eastern ironwork, which I could only trace by touch, but which I loosened at last.
and the chased ironwork, which drove Biscornette to despair?
He was musing deeply by the mixed ironwork and ashes of his vanished motor-bicycle, a melancholy figure.
Once the chords began to buckle, there were thousands of tons of ironwork, all riveted together and lying in midair without support.
Lofty pillars formed of cannon, superposed upon huge mortars as a base, supported the fine ironwork of the arches, a perfect piece of cast-iron lacework.
Besides, even if he had tried to do it, he would have brought all that ironwork down to the ground.
Ar rayed--I MUST say arrayed--arrayed artlessly in dazzling white paint as to wood and dark green as to ironwork the simple-minded distribution of these colours evoked the images of simple-minded peace, of arcadian felicity; and the childish comedy of disease and sorrow struck me sometimes as an abom inably real blot upon that ideal state.
The merchant in London, vesting this hundred pounds in English goods, such as the captain had written for, sent them directly to him at Lisbon, and he brought them all safe to me to the Brazils; among which, without my direction (for I was too young in my business to think of them), he had taken care to have all sorts of tools, ironwork, and utensils necessary for my plantation, and which were of great use to me.
and near a hundred pounds more in ironwork, nails, tools of every kind, staples, hooks, hinges, and every necessary thing I could think of.
The doors had been torn from their hinges and removed; the linings had been stripped off, only a shred hanging here and there by a rusty nail; the lamps were gone, the poles had long since vanished, the ironwork was rusty, the paint was worn away; the wind whistled through the chinks in the bare woodwork; and the rain, which had collected on the roofs, fell, drop by drop, into the insides with a hollow and melancholy sound.
The mail coach doors were on their hinges, the lining was replaced, the ironwork was as good as new, the paint was restored, the lamps were alight; cushions and greatcoats were on every coach-box, porters were thrusting parcels into every boot, guards were stowing away letter-bags, hostlers were dashing pails of water against the renovated wheels; numbers of men were pushing about, fixing poles into every coach; passengers arrived, portmanteaus were handed up, horses were put to; in short, it was perfectly clear that every mail there, was to be off directly.
And who bought the ironworks of Manson and of Shuman and of Van Deher and of Atwood, which have all been given up of late?