irony


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Related to irony: dramatic irony

i·ro·ny

 (ī′rə-nē, ī′ər-)
n. pl. i·ro·nies
1.
a. The use of words to express something different from and often opposite to their literal meaning.
b. An expression or utterance marked by a deliberate contrast between apparent and intended meaning: "the embodiment of the waspish don, from his Oxbridge tweeds to the bone-dry ironies of his speech and prose" (Ron Rosenbaum).
2.
a. Incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs: "Hyde noted the irony of Ireland's copying the nation she most hated" (Richard Kain).
b. An occurrence, result, or circumstance notable for such incongruity: the ironies of fate. See Usage Note at ironic.
3. Dramatic irony.
4. Socratic irony.

[French ironie, from Old French, from Latin īrōnīa, from Greek eirōneia, feigned ignorance, from eirōn, dissembler, perhaps from eirein, to say; see wer-5 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots, or from eirein, to fasten together in rows, string together; see ser-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

irony

(ˈaɪrənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. the humorous or mildly sarcastic use of words to imply the opposite of what they normally mean
2. an instance of this, used to draw attention to some incongruity or irrationality
3. incongruity between what is expected to be and what actually is, or a situation or result showing such incongruity
4. (Theatre) See dramatic irony
5. (Philosophy) philosophy See Socratic irony
[C16: from Latin ironia, from Greek eirōneia, from eirōn dissembler, from eirein to speak]

irony

(ˈaɪənɪ)
adj
of, resembling, or containing iron

i•ro•ny

(ˈaɪ rə ni, ˈaɪ ər-)

n., pl. -nies.
1. the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning.
4. an outcome of events contrary to what was, or might have been, expected.
5. the incongruity of this.
6. an objectively sardonic style of speech or writing.
7. an objectively or humorously sardonic utterance, disposition, quality, etc.
[1495–1505; < Latin īrōnīa < Greek eirōneía feigned ignorance, false modesty, derivative of eírōn one who hides his or her true knowledge or capabilities]
syn: irony, satire, sarcasm indicate mockery of a person or thing. irony is exhibited in the organization or structure of either language or literary material. It indirectly presents a contradiction between an action or expression and the context in which it occurs. One thing is said and its opposite implied, as in “Beautiful weather, isn't it?” said when it is raining. Ironic literature exploits the contrast between an ideal and an actual condition, as when events turn out contrary to expectations. satire, also a literary and rhetorical form, is the use of ridicule in exposing human vice and folly. Jonathan Swift wrote social and political satires. sarcasm is a harsh and cutting type of humor. Its distinctive quality is present in the spoken word; it is manifested chiefly by vocal inflection. Sarcastic language may have the form of irony, as in “What a fine musician you turned out to be!”, or it may be a direct statement, as in “You couldn't play one piece correctly if you had two assistants!”

irony

1. The use of words to mean or imply the opposite of what they usually mean.
2. Using expressions of which the opposite to the literal meaning is intended.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.irony - witty language used to convey insults or scornirony - witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own"--Jonathan Swift
humor, wit, witticism, wittiness, humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
2.irony - incongruity between what might be expected and what actually occurs; "the irony of Ireland's copying the nation she most hated"
incongruity, incongruousness - the quality of disagreeing; being unsuitable and inappropriate
Socratic irony - admission of your own ignorance and willingness to learn while exposing someone's inconsistencies by close questioning
3.irony - a trope that involves incongruity between what is expected and what occurs
antiphrasis - the use of a word in a sense opposite to its normal sense (especially in irony)
dramatic irony - (theater) irony that occurs when the meaning of the situation is understood by the audience but not by the characters in the play
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
indeed - (used as an interjection) an expression of surprise or skepticism or irony etc.; "Wants to marry the butler? Indeed!"

irony

noun
1. sarcasm, mockery, ridicule, bitterness, scorn, satire, cynicism, derision, causticity, mordancy She examined his face for a hint of irony, but found none.
2. paradox, ambiguity, absurdity, incongruity, contrariness Opposition parties wasted no time in stressing the irony of the situation.
Translations
سُخْرِيَة الموقِفسُخْرِيَه، تَهَكُّمسُخْرِيَّة
ironie
ironi
ironia
ironija
irónia
írónía, háî, hæînikaldhæîni
皮肉
풍자
ironijaironiškaiironiškas
ironija
ironie
irónia
ironija
ironi
การประชด
alaygarip bir rastlantıince alayironikaderin cilvesi
sự mỉa mai

irony

[ˈaɪərənɪ] Nironía f
the irony of fatelas ironías del destino
life's little ironieslas (pequeñas) ironías de la vida
the irony of it is thatlo irónico es que ...

irony

[ˈaɪərəni] n
[tone, remark] → ironie f
There seemed to be no hint of irony in his voice → On ne décelait aucune trace d'ironie dans sa voix.
without irony → sans ironie
(= odd turn of events) → ironie f
by a curious irony
By a curious irony, they both died of the same rare disease → Une curieuse ironie voulut qu'ils meurent tous deux de la même maladie rare.
the irony is that ... → l'ironie veut que ..., l'ironie est que ...

irony

nIronie f no pl; the irony of the situationdas Ironische an der Situation; the irony of it is that …das Ironische daran ist, dass …, die Ironie liegt darin, dass …; one of the great ironies of historyeine der ironischsten Fügungen der Geschichte; life’s ironiesdie Ironie des Lebens; by some irony of fate, he …durch eine ironische Wendung des Schicksals geschah es, dass er …

irony

[ˈaɪərənɪ] nironia
the irony of it is that ... → l'ironia maggiore è che...
it's one of life's ironies → è un'ironia della sorte or del destino

irony

(ˈaiərəni) plural ˈironies noun
1. a form of deliberate mockery in which one says the opposite of what is obviously true.
2. seeming mockery in a situation, words etc. The irony of the situation was that he stole the money which she had already planned to give him.
ironic(al) (aiˈronik(l)) adjective
iˈronically adverb

irony

سُخْرِيَّة ironie ironi Ironie ειρωνεία ironía ironia ironie ironija ironia 皮肉 풍자 ironie ironi ironia ironia ирония ironi การประชด ince alay sự mỉa mai 讽刺
References in classic literature ?
The slight impression produced on the savage was, however, soon forgotten, and he continued pointing, with taunting irony, toward Alice.
It came dangerously, for one night the river, leaping the feeble barrier of Devil's Ford, swept away houses and banks, scattered with unconscious irony the laboriously collected heaps of gravel left for hydraulic machinery, and spread out a vast and silent lake across the submerged flat.
Jurgis had once been among those who scoffed at the idea of these huge concerns cheating; and so now he could appreciate the bitter irony of the fact that it was precisely their size which enabled them to do it with impunity.
But irony was not for those people; their mental vision was not focused for it.
For your very great politeness, I am sure,' said Miss Murdstone; with an irony which no more affected my aunt, than it discomposed the cannon I had slept by at Chatham.
There had been mad wilful rejections, monstrous forms of self-torture and self-denial, whose origin was fear and whose result was a degradation infinitely more terrible than that fancied degradation from which, in their ignorance, they had sought to escape; Nature, in her wonderful irony, driving out the anchorite to feed with the wild animals of the desert and giving to the hermit the beasts of the field as his companions.
But in the main it must be regarded as the ideal of Socrates, according to Plato's conception of him, appearing in the greatest and most public scene of his life, and in the height of his triumph, when he is weakest, and yet his mastery over mankind is greatest, and his habitual irony acquires a new meaning and a sort of tragic pathos in the face of death.
Oh, it was the grim irony of it all, this so lovely lady garlanded with flowers, that looked so fair as life, till one by one we wondered if she were truly dead, she laid in that so fine marble house in that lonely churchyard, where rest so many of her kin, laid there with the mother who loved her, and whom she loved, and that sacred bell going "Toll
What is more, he will talk to you with excitement and passion of the true normal interests of man; with irony he will upbraid the short- sighted fools who do not understand their own interests, nor the true significance of virtue; and, within a quarter of an hour, without any sudden outside provocation, but simply through something inside him which is stronger than all his interests, he will go off on quite a different tack--that is, act in direct opposition to what he has just been saying about himself, in opposition to the laws of reason, in opposition to his own advantage, in fact in opposition to everything .
The gentleman raised his eyes slowly from the nag to his cavalier, as if he required some time to ascertain whether it could be to him that such strange reproaches were addressed; then, when he could not possibly entertain any doubt of the matter, his eyebrows slightly bent, and with an accent of irony and insolence impossible to be described, he replied to D'Artagnan, "I was not speaking to you, sir.
And what would you do, my dear diplomatist," replied Morcerf, with a slight degree of irony in his voice, "if you did nothing?
The irony with which these words were uttered did not escape the marechal.