irradicate

irradicate

(ɪˈrædɪˌkeɪt)
vb (tr)
to enroot or fix firmly
References in periodicals archive ?
Tracy Lane At the end of the day, that person was a terrorist and therefore the UK should not have to justify why and what was done to irradicate him - end of
For these crimes you have been judged to be non-worthy of your presence on our internet, and this action has been taken as a first step to irradicate (sic) this presence permanently," the message added.
It is important that we continue to work to irradicate the stereotypes that still exist, especially those that we pass around among ourselves.
The National Farmers' Retail and Markets Association, a new organisation launched at the Royal Show in Warwickshire this week, said market managers had called for producer verification to irradicate so called 'white van men' from taking advantage of farmers' markets.
Know Before You Go is a FCO campaign to irradicate ignorance, increase traveller safety and cut costs for the taxpayer, who foots the bill to bail out thousands of tourists in trouble.
Even the most technologically oriented cannot be 100% certain that a glitch, virus, program failure, or what have you might not irradicate them irretrievably.
If we can irradicate the mistakes I think we have a chance of getting results against anyone - even teams like the Czech republic.
The powers that be must act to irradicate this situation, placing formidable fencing between horses and people so that only the lad or lass can lead the horse from the course to the winner's circle, where only his owner, trainer and breeder should be allowed.