irrationalist


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Related to irrationalist: irrational, irrationalism

irrationalist

(ɪˈræʃənəlɪst)
n
a person who acts or behaves irrationally, or who holds irrational beliefs
adj
pertaining to, or advocating, irrationalism
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References in periodicals archive ?
s insistence that Kierkegaard is not an irrationalist.
And his attempts to evade control systems sometimes led him down bizarre paths, some of them excessively rationalist and some irrationalist.
It builds on a trend in the last two decades that has argued systematically against irrationalist and fideist interpretations of Kierkegaard's transitions between existential "stages" or fundamental attitudes towards life.
In particular, Martin, like Biro, emphasizes that critical theory could serve as a corrective to an irrationalist tendency in deep ecology, since it offers a sophisticated critique of instrumentalist reason that nonetheless simultaneously preserves a respect for reason more generally.
For liberal political philosophers, postmodern political theory represents a systematically incoherent, irrationalist and ultimately non-serious body of thought.
I think he said that Hamas is portrayed as irrationalist and jihadist.
All over again the West confronts an irrationalist, agonistic theocreatic/ideocratic system which is essentially opposed to its existence.
This is a tour de force, a must reading for all those who have despaired over the irrationalist attack on Muslim civilization and its adherents in recent years.
How was it possible for someone with a knowledge of that great irrationalist movement, of figures like Shelley or Byron, not to understand that it was precisely a deeply rooted archetype--the Holy Innocent--that the Hicks narrative was slotting into?
As this preliminary analysis shows, Wahhabism has emerged as the ideological vanguard of a highly militant Islamism that is swamping traditional Islam, subverting key Western institutions and serving as the basis of a major new form of irrationalist totalitarian ideology operating on a global scale.
In conclusion, the topic of the war shows once again how Pessoa, focusing exclusively on notions such as those of power and Dionysian intoxication, actually ends up adopting the questionable and irrationalist image of Nietzsche widespread at the beginning of the century.
By contrast, Coleridge believes irrationalist tendencies to be so deeply ingrained in language--and even properly so from his conservative perspective--that pure reason will always be at risk from its very expression.