irreducible

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ir·re·duc·i·ble

 (ĭr′ĭ-do͞o′sə-bəl, -dyo͞o′-)
adj.
Impossible to reduce to a desired, simpler, or smaller form or amount: irreducible burdens.

ir′re·duc′i·bil′i·ty, ir′re·duc′i·ble·ness n.
ir′re·duc′i·bly adv.

irreducible

(ˌɪrɪˈdjuːsɪbəl)
adj
1. not able to be reduced or lessened
2. not able to be brought to a simpler or reduced form
3. (Mathematics) maths
a. (of a polynomial) unable to be factorized into polynomials of lower degree, as (x2 + 1)
b. (of a radical) incapable of being reduced to a rational expression, as √(x + 1)
ˌirreˌduciˈbility, ˌirreˈducibleness n
ˌirreˈducibly adv

ir•re•duc•i•ble

(ˌɪr ɪˈdu sə bəl, -ˈdyu-)

adj.
1. not reducible; incapable of being reduced, diminished, or further simplified.
2. incapable of being brought into a different condition or form.
[1625–35]
ir`re•duc`i•bil′i•ty, ir`re•duc′i•ble•ness, n.
ir`re•duc′i•bly, adv.

irreducible

Incapable of being restored to a former condition or position.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.irreducible - incapable of being made smaller or simpler; "an irreducible minimum"; "an irreducible formula"; "an irreducible hernia"
reducible - capable of being reduced; "reducible to a set of principles of human nature"- Edmund Wilson
Translations

irreducible

[ˌɪrɪˈdjuːsəbl] ADJirreducible

irreducible

[ˌɪrɪˈdjuːsɪbəl] adjirréductible
the irreducible complexity of human life → l'irréductible complexité de la vie

irreducible

adj (Chem, Math) → nicht reduzierbar; the irreducible minimumdas Allermindeste

ir·re·duc·i·ble

a. irreducible, que no puede reducirse.
References in classic literature ?
Is there ultimately no difference, or do images remain as irreducibly and exclusively psychological?
Aristotle, for example, held that human excellences were irreducibly diverse: Courage is not the same as moderation which is not the same as justice, magnanimity, or friendship.
This allows for an explanation of free actions which is not ultimately brute, but irreducibly normative.
The Protestant themes of revelation (Kierkegaard) and divine freedom (Barth) can produce an incarnational theology that, though grounded in a particular event, can nevertheless be appreciated in a way that "keeps the human grasp on divine possibility in commerce with the neighbor (or with ourselves) irreducibly open" (328).
However, Macarthur doubts that even a naturalism of such liberality can solve or dissolve the issue entirely, for its own claims to knowledge are irreducibly normative in presupposing the values inherent in scientific rationality, and of this normativity we can have no science.
Sound is irreducibly temporal; and, in my view, sound art powerfully manifests time--not the pulsed time of music but the deeper time of duration, temporal flow itself.
Many ID advocates construct the filter version of the design argument using, as their prime example, the contention that irreducibly complex biochemical structures cannot be explained by known Darwinian natural mechanisms.
Arguing that unintelligent accounts failed to explain the development of irreducibly complex systems such as blood clotting, the human immune system and the bacterial flagellum, Darwin's Black Box was internationally reviewed in over one hundred publications and named one of the 100 most important books of the 20th century by National Review and World magazine.
This "conceptual secularism" undercuts the common attempt by critics to rule natural law theory out of court on the grounds that it is irreducibly religious.
Finally, we will be left with the irreducibly labor- and capital-intensive human industries of what we might call "charm": tourism, education, entertainment, adventure, religion, sport, fashion, art, history, movies, ritual, personal development, politics, the eternal soap opera of relationships.
According to proponents of relational direct realism, veridical perceptual experiences are irreducibly relational mental states that include as constituents perceived physical objects or intrinsic aspects of them.
emphatically claims that emotions have this bodily aspect but are also irreducibly intentional: they are always about something particular.