irresolutely


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ir·res·o·lute

 (ĭ-rĕz′ə-lo͞ot′)
adj.
1. Unsure of how to act or proceed; undecided.
2. Lacking in resolution; indecisive.

ir·res′o·lute′ly adv.
ir·res′o·lute′ness, ir·res′o·lu′tion n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.irresolutely - lacking determination or decisiveness
resolutely - showing firm determination or purpose; "she resolutely refused to look at him or speak to him"; "he entered the building resolutely"
Translations

irresolutely

[ɪˈrezəluːtlɪ] ADVirresolutamente, indecisamente

irresolutely

References in classic literature ?
The old count began irresolutely to admonish Nicholas and beg him to abandon his purpose.
His face was turned to the hillside, where a man had just emerged from the woods, and was halting irresolutely before the glaring expanse of upheaved gravel and glistening boulders that stretched between him and the shaded group.
Come, forgive her, Dolly, she won't do it again," he said of the little sinner, who had not gone to Fanny, but was standing irresolutely before her mother, waiting and looking up from under her brows to catch her mother's eye.
Astoa changed his weight irresolutely from one foot to the other.
He nodded, turned toward the door to obey, and paused irresolutely.
The old man looked, irresolutely and helplessly, first at her, then to the right and left, then at her again, and shook his head.
Presently she gave over sky- larking, and moved irresolutely about, sighing once or twice and glancing furtively and wistfully toward Tom.
The gendarme looked irresolutely at his companion, who returned for answer a sign that said, "I see no great harm in telling him now," and the gendarme replied, --
The girl seemed to waver, and Frome saw her twirl the end of her scarf irresolutely about her fingers.
He stood up at this, wandered across the room, stared with void eyes at one of the pictures against the old red damask, and came back irresolutely to her side.
In token of this, a great many doors were opening and shutting, two or three people stood irresolutely on the stairs, now going a few steps up, and now a few steps down, and Sir Francis himself had come out from his study, with the "Times" under his arm, and a complaint about noise and draughts from the open door which, at least, had the effect of bundling the people who did not want to go into the carriage, and sending those who did not want to stay back to their rooms.
Trent swore softly, and then looked irresolutely over his shoulder to where Monty was sleeping.