irresolute

(redirected from irresolutions)
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ir·res·o·lute

 (ĭ-rĕz′ə-lo͞ot′)
adj.
1. Unsure of how to act or proceed; undecided.
2. Lacking in resolution; indecisive.

ir·res′o·lute′ly adv.
ir·res′o·lute′ness, ir·res′o·lu′tion n.

irresolute

(ɪˈrɛzəˌluːt)
adj
lacking resolution; wavering; hesitating
irˈresoˌlutely adv
irˈresoˌluteness, irˌresoˈlution n

ir•res•o•lute

(ɪˈrɛz əˌlut)

adj.
not resolute; doubtful; infirm of purpose; vacillating.
[1565–75]
ir•res′o•lute`ly, adv.
ir•res′o•lute`ness, ir•res`o•lu′tion, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.irresolute - uncertain how to act or proceed; "the committee was timid and mediocre and irresolute"
indecisive - not definitely settling something; "a long and indecisive war"
resolute - firm in purpose or belief; characterized by firmness and determination; "stood resolute against the enemy"; "faced with a resolute opposition"; "a resolute and unshakeable faith"

irresolute

adjective indecisive, weak, hesitating, doubtful, unsettled, unstable, tentative, wavering, hesitant, undecided, fickle, unsteady, infirm, vacillating, in two minds, undetermined, half-arsed (Brit. slang), half-assed (U.S. & Canad. slang), half-hearted They launched the attack for fear of seeming irresolute.
decisive, strong, firm, determined, settled, fixed, resolved, stable, steady, stalwart, resolute, steadfast

irresolute

adjective
Translations

irresolute

[ɪˈrezəluːt] ADJ [person, character] → indeciso, irresoluto

irresolute

[ɪˈrɛzəluːt] adjirrésolu(e), indécis(e)

irresolute

irresolute

[ɪˈrɛzəluːt] adj (person, character) → irresoluto/a, indeciso/a
References in periodicals archive ?
There are nascent ironies and irresolutions here; indeed, Kenmuir is careful to show that Finnaughty's own views are not universally accepted even within his own Wildlife Department.
It might also have remained open--in large and unflinching ways--to what lies on museological horizons beyond biculturalism, and to irresolutions implicit in the ongoing history of settlement.
The complex role of the theaters in the development of English nationalism, however, remains a subtext in Clark's study, not a principal focus of investigation, since he wishes to "return to a more formal questioning of the predicaments and tensions, resolutions and irresolutions of these dark comedies that were modulating into tragicomedy's resolving formulae of miraculous grace and forgiveness" (23).