ischial


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Related to ischial: ischial bursitis

is·chi·um

 (ĭs′kē-əm)
n. pl. is·chi·a (-kē-ə)
The lowest of the three major bones that constitute each half of the pelvis.

[Latin, hip joint, from Greek iskhion.]

is′chi·al (-əl) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
infection or SCI-related complications) P9 Stable post-acute SCI fit for rehabilitation P10 Stable post-acute SCI with sacral, ischial or trochanteric pressure ulcer, otherwise fit for rehabilitation * Inclusion criteria: acute traumatic spinal cord injury; exclusion criteria: severe head injury, Glasgow Coma Score <13/15 or <9T/15, polytrauma.
DBS 13) assessed the long-term functional capability of one participant (K3 activity level) after he changed from a PTB socket with ischial weight-bearing features to a VAS socket [39].
On the thigh, I identify the adductor longus tendon as well as a little soft spot or depression just beneath the tendon and lateral to the descending ischial pubic ramus.
The "sit bones" (otherwise known as the ischial tuberosities) are on the bottom rim of each side of the pelvis.
The purpose of this notice is to a single market for studies, prototyping, manufacturing, supply and installation of shelters, glass walls, technical cabinets, lockers, service centers and information, barrierages, Assize bench and ischial, validation terminals, multifunctional poles, pier mirror, totems, input media information, advertising materials, small furniture and miscellaneous equipment stations, as well as spare parts for maintenance.
Concurrent whole body bone scan was also completed which provided the evidence of diffuse skeletal metastasis, including skull, left scapula, right sacroiliac joint, and ischial tuberosity.
The posterior tunnels were made by dissecting the fibromuscular layer towards the ischial spine.
A third small epiphysis also forms in the ischial region and contributes to its normal growth.
2012) used length and/or breadth measurements of cranial and ischial bones for age estimates.
These lesions representing cortical stress fractures filled with poorly mineralized callus, osteoid, and fibrous tissue, are common along the axillary margins of the scapula, the inner margin of the femoral neck, the proximal dorsal aspect of the ulna, the ribs, and the pubic and ischial rami (2).