isle

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Related to isles: British Isles

isle

 (īl)
n. Abbr. I.
An island, especially a small one.

[Middle English ile, from Old French isle, from Vulgar Latin *īsula, from Latin īnsula.]

isle

(aɪl)
n
an island, esp a small one: used in literature and (when cap.) in place names
[C13: from Old French isle, from Latin insula island]

isle

(aɪl)

n., v. isled, isl•ing. n.
1. a small island.
2. any island.
v.t.
3. to make into or as if into an isle.
4. to place on or as if on an isle.
[1250–1300; Middle English i(s)le < Old French < Latin īnsula]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isle - a small islandisle - a small island      
Translations
جَزيرَه
ostrov
ø
eyja
sala
adacık

isle

[aɪl] N (= poet) → isla f

isle

[ˈaɪl] nîle fIsle of Man n
the Isle of Man → l'île f de ManIsle of Wight n
the Isle of Wight → l'île f de Wight

isle

n (poet)Eiland nt (poet); the Isle of Mandie Insel Man

isle

[aɪl] n (liter) → isola

isle

(ail) noun
(used mostly in place-names) an island. the Isle of Wight.
References in classic literature ?
She was the daughter of a gentleman of those isles, by a lady whose misfortune it was, if you will," said the old man, proudly, "to be descended, remotely, from that unfortunate class who are so basely enslaved to administer to the wants of a luxurious people.
There now is your insular city of the Manhattoes, belted round by wharves as Indian isles by coral reefs--commerce surrounds it with her surf.
He published his manifesto, whereby he set himself forth as the deliverer of the isles of the sea and vicar-general of all Oceanica.
All other literatures endure only as the elms which overshadow our houses; but this is like the great dragon-tree of the Western Isles, as old as mankind, and, whether that does or not, will endure as long; for the decay of other literatures makes the soil in which it thrives.
Then Sir Brian de les Isles and Grummore Grummorsum, knights of the castle, encountered with Sir Aglovale and Sir Tor, and Sir Tor smote down Sir Grummore Grummorsum to the earth.
They were those which treat of the haunts of sea-fowl; of "the solitary rocks and promontories" by them only inhabited; of the coast of Norway, studded with isles from its southern extremity, the Lindeness, or Naze, to the North Cape -
But, all the same, the reader will admit that it must be lonely for me, and not another sister left to take pity on me, all somewhere happily settled down in the Fortunate Isles.
These were the prime in order and in might; The rest were long to tell, though far renown'd, Th' IONIAN Gods, of JAVANS Issue held Gods, yet confest later then Heav'n and Earth Thir boasted Parents; TITAN Heav'ns first born With his enormous brood, and birthright seis'd By younger SATURN, he from mightier JOVE His own and RHEA'S Son like measure found; So JOVE usurping reign'd: these first in CREET And IDA known, thence on the Snowy top Of cold OLYMPUS rul'd the middle Air Thir highest Heav'n; or on the DELPHIAN Cliff, Or in DODONA, and through all the bounds Of DORIC Land; or who with SATURN old Fled over ADRIA to th' HESPERIAN Fields, And ore the CELTIC roam'd the utmost Isles.
Those who have visited the Zetland Islands, are familiar with the description of castles called by the inhabitants Burghs; and by the Highlanders for they are also to be found both in the Western Isles and on the mainland Duns.
You must know, sire, that my father was Mahmoud, the king of this country, the Black Isles, so called from the four little mountains which were once islands, while the capital was the place where now the great lake lies.
He first cast anchor at Botany Bay, visited the Friendly Isles, New Caledonia, then directed his course towards Santa Cruz, and put into Namouka, one of the Hapai group.
The scattered isles Uprose, black-looming o'er the tranquil deeps, Where the reflected heavens wanly showed A lingering gleam.