isle


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Related to isle: Black Isle

isle

 (īl)
n. Abbr. I.
An island, especially a small one.

[Middle English ile, from Old French isle, from Vulgar Latin *īsula, from Latin īnsula.]

isle

(aɪl)
n
an island, esp a small one: used in literature and (when cap.) in place names
[C13: from Old French isle, from Latin insula island]

isle

(aɪl)

n., v. isled, isl•ing. n.
1. a small island.
2. any island.
v.t.
3. to make into or as if into an isle.
4. to place on or as if on an isle.
[1250–1300; Middle English i(s)le < Old French < Latin īnsula]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isle - a small islandisle - a small island      
Translations
جَزيرَه
ostrov
ø
eyja
sala
adacık

isle

[aɪl] N (= poet) → isla f

isle

[ˈaɪl] nîle fIsle of Man n
the Isle of Man → l'île f de ManIsle of Wight n
the Isle of Wight → l'île f de Wight

isle

n (poet)Eiland nt (poet); the Isle of Mandie Insel Man

isle

[aɪl] n (liter) → isola

isle

(ail) noun
(used mostly in place-names) an island. the Isle of Wight.
References in classic literature ?
Three of them ran something like the following, but I do not pretend to quote: -- Sacred To the Memory of John Talbot, Who, at the age of eighteen, was lost overboard, Near the Isle of Desolation, off Patagonia, November 1st,
He called one to him in the grey morning watch, when the day was just breaking, and taking his hand, said that while in Nantucket he had chanced to see certain little canoes of dark wood, like the rich war-wood of his native isle; and upon inquiry, he had learned that all whalemen who died in Nantucket, were laid in those same dark canoes, and that the fancy of being so laid had much pleased him; for it was not unlike the custom of his own race, who, after embalming a dead warrior, stretched him out in his canoe, and so left him to be floated away to the starry archipelagoes; for not only do they believe that the stars are isles, but that far beyond all visible horizons, their own mild, uncontinented seas, interflow with the blue heavens; and so form the white breakers of the milky way.
What though the spicy breezes Blow soft o'er Ceylon's isle - '
I've seen the Black Sea and the Red Sea; I rounded the Isle of Wight; I discovered the Yellow River, And the Orange too by night.
Sometimes the isle was thick with savages, with whom we fought, sometimes full of dangerous animals that hunted us, but in all my fancies nothing occurred to me so strange and tragic as our actual adventures.
It is about one third as large as the Isle of Wight, and extremely fruitful: it is governed by the head of a certain tribe, who are all magicians.
Although the stranger's name and rank were unknown to Rosalie's father, he was really the son of the King of the Golden Isle, which had for capital a city that extended from one sea to another.
The author embarks with the patriarch, narrowly escapes shipwreck near the isle of Socotora; enters the Arabian Gulf, and the Red Sea.
Meanwhile the king, who, with more reason than the cardinal, showed his hatred for Buckingham, although scarcely arrived was in such a haste to meet the enemy that he commanded every disposition to be made to drive the English from the Isle of Re, and afterward to press the siege of La Rochelle; but notwithstanding his earnest wish, he was delayed by the dissensions which broke out between MM.
And thus thy memory is to me Like some enchanted far-off isle In some tumultuos sea -- Some ocean throbbing far and free With storms -- but where meanwhile Serenest skies continually Just o're that one bright island smile.
From Smyrna towards the Holy Land the course will lay through the Grecian Archipelago, close by the Isle of Patmos, along the coast of Asia, ancient Pamphylia, and the Isle of Cyprus.
But you forget that you have made me a present of Belle- Isle.