isogloss


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i·so·gloss

 (ī′sə-glôs′, -glŏs′)
n.
A geographic boundary line delimiting the area in which a given linguistic feature occurs.

[iso- + Greek glōssa, language, tongue.]

i′so·gloss′al adj.

isogloss

(ˈaɪsəʊˌɡlɒs)
n
(Linguistics) a line drawn on a map around the area in which a linguistic feature is to be found, such as a particular pronunciation of a given word
ˌisoˈglossal, ˌisoˈglottic, ˌisoˈglossic, ˌisoˈglottal adj

i•so•gloss

(ˈaɪ səˌglɒs, -ˌglɔs)

n.
(in the study of the geographical distribution of dialects) a line on a map marking the limits of an area within which a feature of speech occurs, as the use of a particular word or pronunciation.
[< German (1892)]
i`so•glos′sal, adj.
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Here again, the participating Taimyrian languages Forest Enets, Tundra Enets, Nganasan, Dolgan and Evenki behave similarly, but this isogloss stretches further south and east (see Siegl 2013 : 422-424).
Certainly, isoglosses can be helpful to show the limits of individual features, so long as it is made clear that an isogloss is an approximate boundary for that feature alone, and therefore makes a "generalization about the evidence" (Kretzschmar 2009: 69).
2009), an isogloss is a boundary line that defines areas where the use of a particular linguistic feature is different (Finch 2000; From kin and Rodman 2002; Crystal 2005).
The results of the analysis are presented in a detailed series of isogloss bundles along with specific figures and percentages for numbers of features shared or not shared (pp.
Post-vocalic /r/ is a sociolinguistic variable in New York City, in England it defines basically a large-scale dialect isogloss, and in many parts of the American Midwest it shows little variation of any sort.
It would appear that whatever the explicit ideology, lines are not clearly drawn between "Judaism" and "Christianity," but at least one highly significant isogloss (that is, highly significant for the Rabbis, for whom it marks the difference between orthodox and heretic, just as it does for Justin and the Pseudo-Clementines); the line is between Jew and Jew, between Christian and Christian, thus marking a site of overlap and ambiguity between the two "religions" that the texts are at pains to construct.
At the same time, there are no strong isogloss bundles between areas VI and VII, or between III and IV, which explains the absence of transitional areas between them.
23) Starostin (1988:113) gives as an isogloss with the IE words, Proto-East Caucasian *wVtVrV 'child (up to one year old)': Tsakurian vudra 'kid up to one year old', Tsez beduro 'cub', Batzbean bader, Chechen ber 'child' and possibly within a Nostratic etymology (Illifi-Svityc 1967: 337).
This fact is an additional complicating factor for assessing the degree of accommodation and for establishing accommodation index because the same feature can be analyzed either as maintenance of UEA isogloss or as influence of fusha.
Here the bar charts quantify the sociolinguistic realities to provide a firm basis for a variationist interpretation of the data, establishing with some precision an isogloss that had hitherto only been recognised informally (e.
This is a clear grammatical isogloss, which, interestingly, runs between the group Kihnu-Latvian-Livonian and the remaining Estonian dialects and Standard Estonian, as the latter seem to lack such imperative questions.
John) are two sizeable villages between King's Lynn and Wisbech, lying to the east of an isogloss dividing "linguistic Norfolk"--to the east--from those few villages of Norfolk to the west of the isogloss that share few of the traditional defining characteristics of East Anglian dialects (see Trudgill 2001; Britain 2002).