isolationism

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i·so·la·tion·ism

 (ī′sə-lā′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A national policy of abstaining from political or economic relations with other countries.

i′so·la′tion·ist n. & adj.

isolationism

(ˌaɪsəˈleɪʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a policy of nonparticipation in or withdrawal from international affairs
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an attitude favouring such a policy
ˌisoˈlationist n, adj

i•so•la•tion•ism

(ˌaɪ səˈleɪ ʃəˌnɪz əm, ˌɪs ə-)

n.
the policy or doctrine that peace and economic advancement can best be achieved by isolating one's country from alliances and commitments with other countries.
[1920–25, Amer.]
i`so•la′tion•ist, n., adj.

isolationism

the policy or doctrine directed toward the isolation of a country from the affairs of other nations by a deliberate abstention from political, military, and economic agreements. — isolationist, n.
See also: Politics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isolationism - a policy of nonparticipation in international economic and political relations
foreign policy - a policy governing international relations
Translations
izolacionizam
izolacionizmus

isolationism

[ˌaɪsəʊˈleɪʃənɪzəm] Naislacionismo m

isolationism

[ˌaɪsəˈleɪʃənɪzəm] nisolationnisme m

isolationism

isolationism

[ˌaɪsəˈleɪʃˌnɪzm] nisolazionismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Had Churchill come into power sooner and had Roosevelt fought off the pacifists and isolationists sooner, hundreds of thousands - if not millions - of souls would have been saved.
In addition, they fed American interventionist groups ammunition against such isolationists as Congressman Hamilton Fish (Republican, NY) and sought to influence men like Senator Arthur Vandenberg (Republican, MI) to move towards interventionism.
isolationists could not protect America from a world on fire, and, although prayer might affect the outcome of the war, Christianity would not restrain Hitler.
Isolationists like Pat Buchanan are right when they say that American workers have been betrayed by global business practices.
In smearing as nativists, protectionists, and isolationists those who wish to stop the invasion, halt the export of factories and jobs to Asia, and stop the unnecessary wars, Bush is attacking the last true conservatives in his party.
First, there were isolationists in America who didn't want to be involved in world problems and allowed European leaders to structure a bad peace agreement.
Although Dewey and Vandenberg would later become internationalists--and Dewey may have been a closet one even then--all three men were campaigning as isolationists, determined to keep this country, out of World War II, which had started the previous September.
That was an obvious attempt by Clinton to link critics of his trip to the isolationists of the 1930s and even the early '40s who ignored the growth of Nazi power in Europe and Japanese aggression in Asia.
Roosevelt consistently refused to back them, choosing to appease the isolationists in Congress, so he might get their acquiescence on other issues more interesting to him.
Its thinkers span a broad spectrum, from patriotic isolationists like Pat Buchanan, to go it-done interventionists like Rumsfeld and Cheney, to more moderate figures like Sen.
His opponents for the nomination were all isolationists.