isometric


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

i·so·met·ric

 (ī′sə-mĕt′rĭk)
adj. also i′so·met′ri·cal (-rĭ-kəl)
1. Of or exhibiting equality in dimensions or measurements.
2. Of or being a crystal system of three equal axes lying at right angles to each other.
3. Physiology Of or involving muscular contraction against resistance in which the length of the muscle remains the same.
n.
A line connecting isometric points.

[From Greek īsometros, of equal measure : īso-, iso- + metron, measure; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

i′so·met′ri·cal·ly adv.

isometric

(ˌaɪsəʊˈmɛtrɪk)
adj
1. having equal dimensions or measurements
2. (Physiology) physiol of or relating to muscular contraction that does not produce shortening of the muscle
3. (General Physics) (of a crystal or system of crystallization) having three mutually perpendicular equal axes
4. (Chemistry) crystallog another word for cubic4
5. (Poetry) prosody having or made up of regular feet
6. (General Engineering) (of a method of projecting a drawing in three dimensions) having the three axes equally inclined and all lines drawn to scale
n
7. (General Engineering) Also called: isometric drawing a drawing made in this way
8. (General Physics) Also called: isometric line a line on a graph showing variations of pressure with temperature at constant volume
[C19: from Greek isometria (see iso- + -metry) + -ic]
ˌisoˈmetrically adv

i•so•met•ric

(ˌaɪ səˈmɛ trɪk)

adj. Also, i`so•met′ri•cal.
1. of, pertaining to, or having equality of measure.
2. of or pertaining to isometric exercise.
3. noting or pertaining to a system of crystallization that is characterized by three equal axes at right angles to one another.
4. designating a method of projection (isomet′ric projec′tion) in which a three-dimensional object is represented by a drawing (i′somet′ric draw′ing) having the horizontal edges of the object drawn usu. at a 30° angle and all verticals projected perpendicularly from a horizontal base.
n.
6. an isometric drawing.
[1830–40; iso- + -metric]
i`so•met′ri•cal•ly, adv.

i·so·met·ric

(ī′sə-mĕt′rĭk)
See cubic.

isometric

- From Latin isus, "equal," and -metria, "measuring."
See also related terms for measuring.

isometric

Describes contraction that increases the internal tension in a muscle without shortening it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isometric - a line connecting isometric pointsisometric - a line connecting isometric points  
line - a mark that is long relative to its width; "He drew a line on the chart"
contour, contour line - a line drawn on a map connecting points of equal height
Adj.1.isometric - related by an isometry
math, mathematics, maths - a science (or group of related sciences) dealing with the logic of quantity and shape and arrangement
2.isometric - of or involving muscular contraction in which tension increases while length remains constant
physiology - the branch of the biological sciences dealing with the functioning of organisms
isotonic - of or involving muscular contraction in which tension is constant while length changes
3.isometric - having equal dimensions or measurements
equal - having the same quantity, value, or measure as another; "on equal terms"; "all men are equal before the law"
4.isometric - of a crystal system characterized by three equal axes at right angles
crystallography - the branch of science that studies the formation and structure of crystals
cubic, three-dimensional - having three dimensions
Translations
izometrikus

isometric

[ˌaɪsəʊˈmetrɪk] ADJisométrico
isometric exercisesejercicios mpl isométricos

isometric

[ˌaɪsəʊˈmɛtrɪk] adj (Math, Geog, Poetry) → isometrico/a

iso·met·ric

a. isométrico-a, de dimensiones iguales.

isometric

adj isométrico
References in classic literature ?
In the valley beneath lay the city they had just left, its more prominent buildings showing as in an isometric drawing--among them the broad cathedral tower, with its Norman windows and immense length of aisle and nave, the spires of St Thomas's, the pinnacled tower of the College, and, more to the right, the tower and gables of the ancient hospice, where to this day the pilgrim may receive his dole of bread and ale.
2 Near-isometric extension problem and Non-surjective isometric extension problem
Isometric exercises work one muscle against another so they both get stronger.
In the study, 22 college-age adults performed isometric contractions of the left elbow flexor muscle at an intensity equal to a quarter of their maximal voluntary contraction held until task failure.
This is a systematic presentation of results concerning the isometric embedding of Riemannian manifolds in local and global Euclidean spaces, especially focused on the isometric embedding of surfaces in a Euclidean space R3 and primarily employing partial differential equation techniques for proving results.
Maximal isokinetic and isometric strength of the elbow flexors was measured using a specialised measuring device called a dynamometer.
The overall isometric design requires a dead center nocking point, which together with the centershot tool positions the arrow exactly where it needs to be for paradox free flight--dead center.
This involves rapid termination of eccentric loading followed by a brief isometric phase and an explosive rebound relying on stored elastic energy and a powerful reflex muscle contraction.
Isometric strength, which is the focus in this study, is defined as the tension generated in a muscle when the muscle is contracting without any apparent change in length.
I spoke with Robert Swezey, MD, the rheumatologist who developed the OsteoBall, and he gave me a more complete explanation: According to the most recent studies, if you have had a heart attack in the past and are stable now, or if you have mild hypertension that is under control either with medication or diet, or both, isometric exercises appear to be safe.
Maximal-effort isometric contractions were done at multiple joint angles, followed by as many dynamic variable resistance repetitions as possible at 40% of the peak torque generated during the isometric contractions.
Previously we observed that following 30 mm of repetitive isometric contractions, recovery of maximal isometric tension (Po) was significantly greater in the rat gastrocnemius-plantaris-soleus (GPS) complex than that observed in the gastrocnemius-plantar (GP) complex after 30 mm of recovery.