isomorphism


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Related to isomorphism: Graph isomorphism

i·so·mor·phism

 (ī′sə-môr′fĭz′əm)
n.
1. Biology Similarity in form, as in organisms of different ancestry.
2. Mathematics A one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two sets such that the result of an operation on elements of one set corresponds to the result of the analogous operation on their images in the other set.
3. A close similarity in the crystalline structure of two or more substances of similar chemical composition.

i′so·mor′phous adj.

isomorphism

(ˌaɪsəʊˈmɔːfɪzəm)
n
1. (Biology) biology similarity of form, as in different generations of the same life cycle
2. (Chemistry) chem the existence of two or more substances of different composition in a similar crystalline form
3. (Mathematics) maths a one-to-one correspondence between the elements of two or more sets, such as those of Arabic and Roman numerals, and between the sums or products of the elements of one of these sets and those of the equivalent elements of the other set or sets

i•so•mor•phism

(ˌaɪ səˈmɔr fɪz əm)

n.
1. the state or property of being isomorphous or isomorphic.
2. Math. a one-to-one relation onto the map between two sets, which preserves the relations existing between elements in its domain.
[1820–30; isomorph (ous) + -ism]

isomorphism

close similarity between the forms of different crystals. See also biology. — isomorph, n.isomorphic, adj.
See also: Physics
similarity in the form or structure of organisms that belong to a different species or genus. — isomorph, n.isomorphic, adj.
See also: Biology

isomorphism

The existence of two or more different substances which have the same crystal structure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isomorphism - (biology) similarity or identity of form or shape or structure
similarity - the quality of being similar
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
Translations
izomorfismus
Isomorphismus
izomorfizam
izomorfizmus

isomorphism

[ˌaɪsəʊˈmɔːfɪzm] nisomorfismo
References in periodicals archive ?
levels of isomorphism and more tightly coupled structures in weakly
H ere we glimpse a clear isomorphism between religious practice and consumer capitalist dynamics.
For this purpose (1) an isomorphism must be established between certain objects of the system S and elements of the set A, and (2) relations (9,10) should be constructed on the grounds of existing natural (physical, chemical a.
For Laqueur, Montaigne's narrative demonstrates both the Renaissance belief in isomorphism between male and female private parts and the possibility of transference between the sexes.
Lost in the list of variables is the more general pressure toward institutional isomorphism that is present in large fields of organization.
This isomorphism between consciousness and sound is on e that is consequently attributed to human nature.
The dysmorphism and isomorphism criteria were examined on the UF-100 in 120 patients with confirmed renal or postrenal hematuria.
Once an organizational field is identified, what are the forces governing change and, in particular, why does isomorphism, i.
Seiichi Suzuki, The Metrical Organization of `Beowulf: Prototype and Isomorphism, Trends in Linguistics: Studies and Monographs 95 (Berlin and New York: Mouton De Gruyter, 1996).
The point is also potentially in tension with his other suggestion that there is 'an isomorphism in Huli and Western legal systems', although he may simply mean that in both systems there is an attempt to define 'normality' and so exclude liability.
Our conclusions are summarized in the section "Rhyme-Meter Isomorphism and the History of Poetic Forms," where we also present general observations on the evolution of poetic forms within a literary tradition.
Then there exists an isomorphism [psi]: Nuc(A)[right arrow]Con(A) of posets.