issued


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is·sue

 (ĭsh′o͞o)
n.
1.
a. A point or matter of discussion, debate, or dispute: What legal and moral issues should we consider?
b. A matter of public concern: debated economic issues.
c. A misgiving, objection, or complaint: had issues with the plan to change the curriculum.
2.
a. A problem or difficulty.
b. A personal problem: is convinced that her boss has issues.
3.
a. The act of circulating, distributing, or publishing by a business, government, or organization: government issue of new bonds.
b. An item or set of items, as stamps or coins, made available at one time by a business, government, or organization.
c. A single copy of a periodical: the May issue of the magazine.
d. A distinct set of copies of an edition of a book distinguished from others of that edition by variations in the printed matter.
e. Proceeds from estates or fines.
f. Something proceeding from a specified source: suspicions that were the issue of a deranged mind.
g. A culminating point leading to a decision: bring a case to an issue.
h. A final result or conclusion, as a solution to a problem.
4.
a. The act or an instance of flowing, passing, or giving out: where the lake gives issue to its waters.
b. A place of egress; an outlet: a lake with no issue to the sea.
5. Medicine
a. A discharge, as of blood or pus.
b. A lesion, wound, or ulcer producing such a discharge.
6. Offspring; progeny: died without issue.
v. is·sued, is·su·ing, is·sues
v.intr.
1.
a. To flow, go, or come out: water issuing from a spring; voices issuing from a room. See Synonyms at appear.
b. To proceed from a source; emerge or come forth: ideas issuing from a discussion. See Synonyms at stem1.
c. To have as a consequence; result: discontent that issued in social unrest.
2. To accrue as proceeds or profit: Little money issued from the stocks.
3. To be born or be descended: generations issuing from an ancestor.
4. To be circulated or published: books issuing from a publisher.
v.tr.
1. To circulate or distribute in an official capacity: issued uniforms to the players.
2. To publish: issued periodic statements.
3. To pour forth or send out; emit: a chimney issuing smoke.
Idioms:
at issue
1. In question; in dispute: "Many people fail to grasp what is really at issue here" (Gail Sheehy).
2. At variance; in disagreement.
join issue
1. To enter into controversy.
2. Law To submit an issue for decision.
take issue
To take an opposing point of view; disagree.

[Middle English, from Old French eissue, issue, from Vulgar Latin *exūta, alteration of Latin exita, feminine past participle of exīre, to go out : ex-, ex- + īre, to go; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

is′su·er n.
is′sue·less adj.
Usage Note: People often use issue to refer to a problem, difficulty, or condition, especially an embarrassing or discrediting one. The word is frequently used in the plural. Thus, a business executive who has been accused of fraud is said to have legal issues, a company facing bankruptcy has financial issues, and a person who picks fights may have anger management issues. Some people dislike this usage, claiming that it is imprecise or euphemistic. The majority of the Usage Panel frowned on it in 2002, but in just over ten years, opinion has shifted such that a majority now find it acceptable. In our 2013 survey, 78 percent of the Usage Panel accepted issue in these examples: That kid has issues and needs to see the guidance counselor. I don't want to hire someone who has issues with carrying out orders from an authority. Although the acceptance was lukewarm (about a third of the panelists found these sentences only "somewhat acceptable"), this is a substantial increase over the 39 percent who accepted similar sentences in 2002. A similar shift of opinion has occurred concerning the use of issue for a technical problem. In 2002, only 18 percent of Panelists approved of the sentence There were a number of issues installing the printer driver in the new release of the software. By 2013, approval had risen to 68 percent. Although issue is now widely acceptable, choosing another word, such as glitch, problem, or complication, can often lend precision to your writing.
Translations

issued

[ˈɪʃuːd] ADJ issued capitalcapital m emitido

issued

a. expedido-a, emitido-a.
References in classic literature ?
The stage was dark and the glow of the furnace had a fine effect, especially as real steam issued from the kettle when the witch took off the cover.
The alarmed colonists believed that the yells of the savages mingled with every fitful gust of wind that issued from the interminable forests of the west.
She now issued forth, as would appear, to defend the entrance, looking, we must needs say, amazingly like the dragon which, in fairy tales, is wont to be the guardian over an enchanted beauty.
That he might make his appearance before his mistress in the true style of a cavalier, he borrowed a horse from the farmer with whom he was domiciliated, a choleric old Dutchman of the name of Hans Van Ripper, and, thus gallantly mounted, issued forth like a knight- errant in quest of adventures.
At length, towards noon, upon the final dismissal of the ship's riggers, and after the Pequod had been hauled out from the wharf, and after the ever-thoughtful Charity had come off in a whaleboat, with her last gift --a night-cap for Stubb, the second mate, her brother-in-law, and a spare bible for the steward -- after all this, the two captains, Peleg and Bildad, issued from the cabin, and turning to the chief mate, Peleg said: Now, Mr.
Now, when with royal Tranquo I visited this wondrous whale, and saw the skull an altar, and the artificial smoke ascending from where the real jet had issued, I marvelled that the king should regard a chapel as an object of vertu.
She had left the church last of all, and, desiring to arrive first at the hall, had issued orders to the coachman to drive faster.
I mean, until the author of this book encountered the Pompadour, and Lady Castlemaine, and some other executive heads of that kind; these were found so difficult to work into the scheme, that it was judged better to take the other tack in this book (which must be issued this fall), and then go into training and settle the question in another book.
The emperor, to commemorate this generous act, and to testify his appreciation of it, issued a decree commanding everybody to buy this benefactor's spectacles and wear them, whether they needed them or not.
The party moved along the hall, the twins in advance, and entered the open parlor door, whence issued a low hum of conversation.
There was a song in every heart; and if the heart was young the music issued at the lips.
And Rebecca looked longingly at Emma Jane's fat, rosy cheeks; at her blue eyes, which said nothing; at her neat nose, which had no character; at her red lips, from between which no word worth listening to had ever issued.