issuing


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Related to issuing: Issuing bank

is·sue

 (ĭsh′o͞o)
n.
1.
a. A point or matter of discussion, debate, or dispute: What legal and moral issues should we consider?
b. A matter of public concern: debated economic issues.
c. A misgiving, objection, or complaint: had issues with the plan to change the curriculum.
2.
a. A problem or difficulty.
b. A personal problem: is convinced that her boss has issues.
3.
a. The act of circulating, distributing, or publishing by a business, government, or organization: government issue of new bonds.
b. An item or set of items, as stamps or coins, made available at one time by a business, government, or organization.
c. A single copy of a periodical: the May issue of the magazine.
d. A distinct set of copies of an edition of a book distinguished from others of that edition by variations in the printed matter.
e. Proceeds from estates or fines.
f. Something proceeding from a specified source: suspicions that were the issue of a deranged mind.
g. A culminating point leading to a decision: bring a case to an issue.
h. A final result or conclusion, as a solution to a problem.
4.
a. The act or an instance of flowing, passing, or giving out: where the lake gives issue to its waters.
b. A place of egress; an outlet: a lake with no issue to the sea.
5. Medicine
a. A discharge, as of blood or pus.
b. A lesion, wound, or ulcer producing such a discharge.
6. Offspring; progeny: died without issue.
v. is·sued, is·su·ing, is·sues
v.intr.
1.
a. To flow, go, or come out: water issuing from a spring; voices issuing from a room. See Synonyms at appear.
b. To proceed from a source; emerge or come forth: ideas issuing from a discussion. See Synonyms at stem1.
c. To have as a consequence; result: discontent that issued in social unrest.
2. To accrue as proceeds or profit: Little money issued from the stocks.
3. To be born or be descended: generations issuing from an ancestor.
4. To be circulated or published: books issuing from a publisher.
v.tr.
1. To circulate or distribute in an official capacity: issued uniforms to the players.
2. To publish: issued periodic statements.
3. To pour forth or send out; emit: a chimney issuing smoke.
Idioms:
at issue
1. In question; in dispute: "Many people fail to grasp what is really at issue here" (Gail Sheehy).
2. At variance; in disagreement.
join issue
1. To enter into controversy.
2. Law To submit an issue for decision.
take issue
To take an opposing point of view; disagree.

[Middle English, from Old French eissue, issue, from Vulgar Latin *exūta, alteration of Latin exita, feminine past participle of exīre, to go out : ex-, ex- + īre, to go; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

is′su·er n.
is′sue·less adj.
Usage Note: People often use issue to refer to a problem, difficulty, or condition, especially an embarrassing or discrediting one. The word is frequently used in the plural. Thus, a business executive who has been accused of fraud is said to have legal issues, a company facing bankruptcy has financial issues, and a person who picks fights may have anger management issues. Some people dislike this usage, claiming that it is imprecise or euphemistic. The majority of the Usage Panel frowned on it in 2002, but in just over ten years, opinion has shifted such that a majority now find it acceptable. In our 2013 survey, 78 percent of the Usage Panel accepted issue in these examples: That kid has issues and needs to see the guidance counselor. I don't want to hire someone who has issues with carrying out orders from an authority. Although the acceptance was lukewarm (about a third of the panelists found these sentences only "somewhat acceptable"), this is a substantial increase over the 39 percent who accepted similar sentences in 2002. A similar shift of opinion has occurred concerning the use of issue for a technical problem. In 2002, only 18 percent of Panelists approved of the sentence There were a number of issues installing the printer driver in the new release of the software. By 2013, approval had risen to 68 percent. Although issue is now widely acceptable, choosing another word, such as glitch, problem, or complication, can often lend precision to your writing.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.issuing - the act of providing an item for general use or for official purposes (usually in quantity); "a new issue of stamps"; "the last issue of penicillin was over a month ago"
supplying, provision, supply - the activity of supplying or providing something
stock issue - (corporation law) the authorization and delivery of shares of stock for sale to the public or the shares thus offered at a particular time
Translations

issuing

[ˈɪʃuːɪŋ] ADJ [company, office] (for shares) → emisor; (for passport, official document) → expedidor

issuing

n. salida.
References in classic literature ?
Then they began to move and execute a kind of skirmish upon the calm water, while a vast number of horsemen on fine horses and in showy liveries, issuing from the city, engaged on their side in a somewhat similar movement.
Before again issuing from it, this spiral runs into a small cone with a concave base, that is turned downward in the shape of a spherical cap.
And again and again she made the circuit of the island, (while the sun rushed down to his slumbers), and at each issuing into the light there was more sorrow about her person, while it grew feebler and far fainter and more indistinct, and at each passage into the gloom there fell from her a darker shade, which became whelmed in a shadow more black.
Issuing thence to the west and south, as a youth leaves the shelter of his parental house, this spirit found the way to the Indies, discovered the coasts of a new continent, and traversed at last the immensity of the great Pacific, rich in groups of islands remote and mysterious like the constellations of the sky.
Characteristics of equity include no maturity date, no ongoing payments, and deep subordination, which means it's low on the hierarchy of debtors who'd receive cash if the issuing company went under.
One way for companies considering issuing warrants to avoid this problem is to have a separate warrant arrangement for the capital investment related to the offering.
Even assuming some level of review is built into the process, the maximum 180-day period for issuing a Generic Legal Advice memorandum seems excessive.
Finally, all parties involved in the construction and renovation of buildings in these jurisdictions should also be aware that the New York City Department of Buildings might be enjoined in the near future from issuing any temporary c/o, at least for residential properties.
FASB and EITF took the extra step of issuing the EITF's tentative consensus for public comment in July, for comment by September 3; it will reconsider the issue at its September meeting.
The career staff have been hard at work issuing "voluntary" recalls (which do not require Commission action).
The issue is how to determine the amount of total compensation cost recognized for compensatory stock options that have no intrinsic value when they are repurchased by the issuing company.