isthmus


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isth·mus

 (ĭs′məs)
n. pl. isth·mus·es or isth·mi (-mī′)
1. A narrow strip of land connecting two larger masses of land.
2. Anatomy
a. A narrow strip of tissue joining two larger organs or parts of an organ.
b. A narrow passage connecting two larger cavities.

[Latin, from Greek isthmos.]

isthmus

(ˈɪsθməs; ˈɪstməs; ˈɪsməs)
n, pl -muses or -mi (-maɪ)
1. (Physical Geography) a narrow strip of land connecting two relatively large land areas
2. (Anatomy) anatomy
a. a narrow band of tissue connecting two larger parts of a structure
b. a narrow passage connecting two cavities
[C16: from Latin, from Greek isthmos]
ˈisthmoid adj

isth•mus

(ˈɪs məs)

n., pl. -mus•es, -mi (-mī).
1. a narrow strip of land, bordered on both sides by water, connecting two larger bodies of land.
2. a relatively narrow passage or strip of tissue joining two cavities or parts of an organ.
[1545–55; < Latin < Greek isthmós narrow passage, isthmus]
isth′moid, adj.

isthmus

A narrow neck of land that joins two larger areas of land.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.isthmus - a relatively narrow strip of land (with water on both sides) connecting two larger land areasisthmus - a relatively narrow strip of land (with water on both sides) connecting two larger land areas
dry land, ground, solid ground, terra firma, earth, land - the solid part of the earth's surface; "the plane turned away from the sea and moved back over land"; "the earth shook for several minutes"; "he dropped the logs on the ground"
2.isthmus - a cord-like tissue connecting two larger parts of an anatomical structureisthmus - a cord-like tissue connecting two larger parts of an anatomical structure
tissue - part of an organism consisting of an aggregate of cells having a similar structure and function

isthmus

noun strip, spit the isthmus of Panama
Translations
بَرْزَخ
šíje
landtange
स्थलडमरूमध्य
földnyelvföldszoros
eiîi, grandi
zemesšaurums
šija
berzahkıstak
перешийок

isthmus

[ˈɪsməs] N (isthmuses or isthmi (pl)) → istmo m

isthmus

[ˈɪsməs] nisthme m

isthmus

nLandenge f, → Isthmus m

isthmus

[ˈɪsməs] nistmo

isthmus

(ˈisməs) noun
a narrow strip of land joining two larger pieces. the Isthmus of Panama.

isth·mus

n. istmo. 1. conducto estrecho que conecta dos cavidades o dos partes mayores; 2. constricción entre dos partes de un órgano o estructura;
aortic ______ de la aorta;
___ of auditory tube___ del tubo auditivo;
___ of the encephalon___ del encéfalo;
___ of the eustachian tube___ de la trompa de Eustaquio;
___ of the fauces___ de las fauces;
___ of the ureter___ de la uretra;
pharyngeal ______ de la faringe;
tubaric ______ tubárico.
References in classic literature ?
So that when I shall hereafter detail to you all the specialities and concentrations of potency everywhere lurking in this expansive monster; when I shall show you some of his more inconsiderable braining feats; I trust you will have renounced all ignorant incredulity, and be ready to abide by this; that though the Sperm Whale stove a passage through the Isthmus of Darien, and mixed the Atlantic with the Pacific, you would not elevate one hair of your eye-brow.
For you never went out of the city either to see the games, except once when you went to the Isthmus, or to any other place unless when you were on military service; nor did you travel as other men do.
I need not tell you, sir," said Ned Land, "that the Red Sea is as much closed as the Gulf, as the Isthmus of Suez is not yet cut; and, if it was, a boat as mysterious as ours would not risk itself in a canal cut with sluices.
The 6th of February, the Nautilus floated in sight of Aden, perched upon a promontory which a narrow isthmus joins to the mainland, a kind of inaccessible Gibraltar, the fortifications of which were rebuilt by the English after taking possession in 1839.
The spot is situated a little above the Isthmus of Suez, in the arm which formerly made a deep estuary, when the Red Sea extended to the Salt Lakes.
It was a part of the great system of granite mountains which forms one of the most important and striking features of North America, stretching parallel to the coast of the Pacific from the Isthmus of Panama almost to the Arctic Ocean; and presenting a corresponding chain to that of the Andes in the southern hemisphere.
Comes old American stock, thirsting across the Great American Desert, mule-backing across the Isthmus, wind-jamming around the Horn, to write brief and forgotten names where ten thousand generations of wild Indians are equally forgotten--names like Halleck, Hastings, Swett, Tait, Denman, Tracy, Grimwood, Carlton, Temple.
Avoiding therefore Nemea on the Isthmus of Corinth, to which he supposed the oracle to refer, Hesiod retired to Oenoe in Locris where he was entertained by Amphiphanes and Ganyetor, sons of a certain Phegeus.
On the west, however, rise the Rocky Mountains, that immense range which, commencing at the Straights of Magellan, follows the western coast of Southern America under the name of the Andes or the Cordilleras, until it crosses the Isthmus of Panama, and runs up the whole of North America to the very borders of the Polar Sea.
Prestwich, in his admirable Memoirs on the eocene deposits of England and France, is able to draw a close general parallelism between the successive stages in the two countries; but when he compares certain stages in England with those in France, although he finds in both a curious accordance in the numbers of the species belonging to the same genera, yet the species themselves differ in a manner very difficult to account for, considering the proximity of the two areas,--unless, indeed, it be assumed that an isthmus separated two seas inhabited by distinct, but contemporaneous, faunas.
At the present time, if we divide America, not by the Isthmus of Panama, but by the southern part of Mexico [5] in lat.
What was the meaning of that South-Sea Exploring Expedition, with all its parade and expense, but an indirect recognition of the fact that there are continents and seas in the moral world to which every man is an isthmus or an inlet, yet unexplored by him, but that it is easier to sail many thousand miles through cold and storm and cannibals, in a government ship, with five hundred men and boys to assist one, than it is to explore the private sea, the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean of one's being alone.