italicize

(redirected from italicization)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

i·tal·i·cize

 (ĭ-tăl′ĭ-sīz′, ī-tăl′-)
tr.v. i·tal·i·cized, i·tal·i·ciz·ing, i·tal·i·ciz·es
1. To print in italic type.
2. To underscore (written matter) with a single line to indicate italics.
3. To emphasize: "italicizing the upper extremity of the pitch spectrum with flute or piccolo" (Arthur Berger).

i·tal′i·ci·za′tion (-sĭ-zā′shən) n.

italicize

(ɪˈtælɪˌsaɪz) or

italicise

vb
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) to print (textual matter) in italic type
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) (tr) to underline (letters, words, etc) with a single line to indicate italics
iˌtaliciˈzation, iˌtaliciˈsation n

i•tal•i•cize

(ɪˈtæl əˌsaɪz, aɪˈtæl-)

v. -cized, -ciz•ing. v.t.
1. to print in italic type.
2. to underscore (a word or the like) with a single line, as in indicating italics.
v.i.
3. to use italics.
i•tal`i•ci•za′tion, n.

italicize


Past participle: italicized
Gerund: italicizing

Imperative
italicize
italicize
Present
I italicize
you italicize
he/she/it italicizes
we italicize
you italicize
they italicize
Preterite
I italicized
you italicized
he/she/it italicized
we italicized
you italicized
they italicized
Present Continuous
I am italicizing
you are italicizing
he/she/it is italicizing
we are italicizing
you are italicizing
they are italicizing
Present Perfect
I have italicized
you have italicized
he/she/it has italicized
we have italicized
you have italicized
they have italicized
Past Continuous
I was italicizing
you were italicizing
he/she/it was italicizing
we were italicizing
you were italicizing
they were italicizing
Past Perfect
I had italicized
you had italicized
he/she/it had italicized
we had italicized
you had italicized
they had italicized
Future
I will italicize
you will italicize
he/she/it will italicize
we will italicize
you will italicize
they will italicize
Future Perfect
I will have italicized
you will have italicized
he/she/it will have italicized
we will have italicized
you will have italicized
they will have italicized
Future Continuous
I will be italicizing
you will be italicizing
he/she/it will be italicizing
we will be italicizing
you will be italicizing
they will be italicizing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been italicizing
you have been italicizing
he/she/it has been italicizing
we have been italicizing
you have been italicizing
they have been italicizing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been italicizing
you will have been italicizing
he/she/it will have been italicizing
we will have been italicizing
you will have been italicizing
they will have been italicizing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been italicizing
you had been italicizing
he/she/it had been italicizing
we had been italicizing
you had been italicizing
they had been italicizing
Conditional
I would italicize
you would italicize
he/she/it would italicize
we would italicize
you would italicize
they would italicize
Past Conditional
I would have italicized
you would have italicized
he/she/it would have italicized
we would have italicized
you would have italicized
they would have italicized
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.italicize - print in italics
print, impress - reproduce by printing

italicize

verb
Translations
vysadit kurzívou
dõlt betûvel szed/nyomtat
skáletra
vysádzať kurzívou
italikleştirmek

italicize

[ɪˈtælɪsaɪz] VTponer en cursiva or bastardilla

italicize

italic

(iˈtӕlik) , (aiˈtalik) adjective
(of print) of the sloping kind used eg to show emphasis and for the examples in this dictionary. This example is printed in italic type.
iˈtalicize, iˈtalicise (-saiz) verb
to put (words) in italics.
iˈtalics noun plural
italic print. This example is printed in italics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, they track the language of Cunningham's (1771) edition almost verbatim, differing principally in matters of italicization, capitalization, and spelling.
My sense is that despite the italicization of key points and the use of summarizing tables, many busy managers would find this 312-page volume a bit "academic.
This is how other languages were made "Islamic" and how English has already started to become a suitable language for Islamic texts: Hajj, Ramadan, and Jihad, for instance, no longer need italicization, even though not all who read these words understand their correct meaning in the full sense.
Finally, a minor quibble concerns the lack of italicization of foreign words (most of which are Italian tempo or expressive markings) which can sometimes impede reading.
Here, print and optics are conflated into one reproductive technology, one that threatens to spread mechanically the contagion of "beggarly daydreaming"--and which, I might add, Coleridge takes full advantage of in his enthusiastic italicization.
Questionable use of punctuation, excessively long sentences, and frequent use of italicization indicate that this book would have benefited from close editing after translation.
198) Finally, he drew the "fault line" on a single word, necessity, and used italics to highlight the Supreme Court's own "revealing italicization of the imperative" of necessity.
In both their severity and repetition, the slanting angle of shadows from venetian blinds represents an all-too-literal italicization of film noir's concern with contiguity and separation, highlighting the point of interface between the criminal and the legitimate that the general public fails to recognize as such.
indentation, italicization, or capitalization of the quotation) is rare.
The italicization of "moral turpitude" implies its vagueness as a category of criminal misdeed and arbitrariness as a rationale for deportation.
The utterances of this voice occupy only three of the 39 lines in the poem, but by their elevated poetic quality (especially in comparison to the colloquial speech of the other speakers), their length (nine or ten syllables in a poem where no other line is longer than seven and most are closer to five), their italicization, and their freedom from the otherwise regular quatrain form, they speak powerfully: "O Jesus burning on the lily cross.
The self-consciously "designed" typography and pointed italicization (ART ALWAYS CHANGES) suggest that it might have been a populist broadside as opposed to an academic treatise, but the clues end there.