itinerant


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i·tin·er·ant

 (ī-tĭn′ər-ənt, ĭ-tĭn′-)
adj.
Traveling from place to place, especially to perform work or a duty: an itinerant judge; itinerant labor.
n.
One who travels from place to place.

[Late Latin itinerāns, itinerant-, present participle of itinerārī, to travel, from Latin iter, itiner-, journey; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

i·tin′er·ant·ly adv.

itinerant

(ɪˈtɪnərənt; aɪ-)
adj
1. itinerating
2. working for a short time in various places, esp as a casual labourer
n
an itinerant worker or other person
[C16: from Late Latin itinerārī to travel, from iter a journey]
iˈtinerantly adv

i•tin•er•ant

(aɪˈtɪn ər ənt, ɪˈtɪn-)

adj.
1. traveling from place to place, esp. on a circuit, as a minister or judge.
2. working in one place for a comparatively short time and then moving on to another place, as a physical or outdoor laborer.
n.
3. a person who alternates between working and wandering.
4. a person who travels from place to place.
[1560–70; < Late Latin itinerant-, s. of itinerāns, present participle of itinerārī to journey, v. derivative of Latin iter-, s. itiner- journey]
i•tin′er•ant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.itinerant - a laborer who moves from place to place as demanded by employment; "itinerant traders"
laborer, labourer, manual laborer, jack - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor
swagger, swaggie, swagman - an itinerant Australian laborer who carries his personal belongings in a bundle as he travels around in search of work
tinker - formerly a person (traditionally a Gypsy) who traveled from place to place mending pots and kettles and other metal utensils as a way to earn a living
Adj.1.itinerant - traveling from place to place to work; "itinerant labor"; "an itinerant judge"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"

itinerant

itinerant

adjective
1. Leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place:
2. Moving from one area to another in search of work:
Translations
potulnýputující
omrejsende
farand-
keliaujantis
ceļojošs
putujúci
gezgingezici

itinerant

[ɪˈtɪnərənt] ADJ [preacher, lecturer, worker] → itinerante; [salesperson] → ambulante

itinerant

[ɪˈtɪnərənt aɪˈtɪnərənt] adjitinérant(e)

itinerant

adjumherziehend, wandernd; minstrelfahrend; an itinerant lifestyleein Wanderleben nt; itinerant preacherWanderprediger(in) m(f); itinerant workerSaison- or Wanderarbeiter(in) m(f); itinerant theatre (Brit) or theater (US) groupWandertruppe f
n (= worker)Wanderarbeiter(in) m(f)

itinerant

[ɪˈtɪnrnt] adj (actors) → girovago/a; (seller) → ambulante; (preacher) → itinerante

itinerant

(iˈtinərənt) adjective
travelling from place to place, eg on business. an itinerant preacher.
itinerary (aiˈtinərəri) noun
a route for a journey.
References in classic literature ?
AN Itinerant Preacher who had wrought hard in the moral vineyard for several hours whispered to a Holy Deacon of the local church:
The man had something strapped on his back and carried a heavy stick-- obviously an itinerant peddler.
I've been an itinerant singer, a circus-rider, when I used to vault like Leotard, and dance on a rope like Blondin.
It was furnished with the cast-off possessions of his bachelor days and with odd things which he sheltered for friends of his who followed itinerant and more or less artistic callings.
Wild-eyed itinerant preachers swarmed over the land; and despite the prohibition of the civil authorities, and the persecution for disobedience, the flames of religious frenzy were fanned by countless camp-meetings.
Another American, who spouted blood and destruction on all political subjects, was an itinerant bee-farmer.
It was not difficult to divine that they were of a class of itinerant showmen--exhibitors of the freaks of Punch--for, perched cross-legged upon a tombstone behind them, was a figure of that hero himself, his nose and chin as hooked and his face as beaming as usual.
It was she who ran to the shed door to take the dish to the "meat man" or "fish man;" she who knew the family histories of the itinerant fruit venders and tin peddlers; she who was asked to take supper or pass the night with children in neighboring villages--children of whose parents her aunts had never so much as heard.
Then, he thought, how soon he 'd turn his back upon the old schoolhouse; snap his fingers in the face of Hans Van Ripper, and every other niggardly patron, and kick any itinerant pedagogue out of doors that should dare to call him comrade!
Music is the "food of love," and Julia fancied for a moment that Antonio might appear as an itinerant organist--but it was only for a moment; for as soon as she figured to herself the Apollo form, bending under the awkward load of a music-grinder, she turned in disgust from the picture.
When an itinerant priest of the persuasion of the Methodists, Baptists, Universalists, or of the more numerous sect of the Presbyterians, was accidentally in the neighborhood, he was ordinarily invited to officiate, and was commonly rewarded for his services by a collection in a hat, before the congregation separated.
He travelled with his engine from farm to farm, from county to county, for as yet the steam threshing-machine was itinerant in this part of Wessex.