itinerant

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i·tin·er·ant

 (ī-tĭn′ər-ənt, ĭ-tĭn′-)
adj.
Traveling from place to place, especially to perform work or a duty: an itinerant judge; itinerant labor.
n.
One who travels from place to place.

[Late Latin itinerāns, itinerant-, present participle of itinerārī, to travel, from Latin iter, itiner-, journey; see ei- in Indo-European roots.]

i·tin′er·ant·ly adv.

itinerant

(ɪˈtɪnərənt; aɪ-)
adj
1. itinerating
2. working for a short time in various places, esp as a casual labourer
n
an itinerant worker or other person
[C16: from Late Latin itinerārī to travel, from iter a journey]
iˈtinerantly adv

i•tin•er•ant

(aɪˈtɪn ər ənt, ɪˈtɪn-)

adj.
1. traveling from place to place, esp. on a circuit, as a minister or judge.
2. working in one place for a comparatively short time and then moving on to another place, as a physical or outdoor laborer.
n.
3. a person who alternates between working and wandering.
4. a person who travels from place to place.
[1560–70; < Late Latin itinerant-, s. of itinerāns, present participle of itinerārī to journey, v. derivative of Latin iter-, s. itiner- journey]
i•tin′er•ant•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.itinerant - a laborer who moves from place to place as demanded by employment; "itinerant traders"
laborer, labourer, manual laborer, jack - someone who works with their hands; someone engaged in manual labor
swagger, swaggie, swagman - an itinerant Australian laborer who carries his personal belongings in a bundle as he travels around in search of work
tinker - formerly a person (traditionally a Gypsy) who traveled from place to place mending pots and kettles and other metal utensils as a way to earn a living
Adj.1.itinerant - traveling from place to place to work; "itinerant labor"; "an itinerant judge"
unsettled - not settled or established; "an unsettled lifestyle"

itinerant

itinerant

adjective
1. Leading the life of a person without a fixed domicile; moving from place to place:
2. Moving from one area to another in search of work:
Translations
potulnýputující
omrejsende
farand-
keliaujantis
ceļojošs
putujúci
gezgingezici

itinerant

[ɪˈtɪnərənt] ADJ [preacher, lecturer, worker] → itinerante; [salesperson] → ambulante

itinerant

[ɪˈtɪnərənt aɪˈtɪnərənt] adjitinérant(e)

itinerant

adjumherziehend, wandernd; minstrelfahrend; an itinerant lifestyleein Wanderleben nt; itinerant preacherWanderprediger(in) m(f); itinerant workerSaison- or Wanderarbeiter(in) m(f); itinerant theatre (Brit) or theater (US) groupWandertruppe f
n (= worker)Wanderarbeiter(in) m(f)

itinerant

[ɪˈtɪnrnt] adj (actors) → girovago/a; (seller) → ambulante; (preacher) → itinerante

itinerant

(iˈtinərənt) adjective
travelling from place to place, eg on business. an itinerant preacher.
itinerary (aiˈtinərəri) noun
a route for a journey.
References in classic literature ?
Then, he thought, how soon he 'd turn his back upon the old schoolhouse; snap his fingers in the face of Hans Van Ripper, and every other niggardly patron, and kick any itinerant pedagogue out of doors that should dare to call him comrade!
The one called Lucas was a mild and meek-looking little gentleman of clerical aspect; he had been an itinerant evangelist, it transpired, and had seen the light and become a prophet of the new dispensation.
It was she who ran to the shed door to take the dish to the "meat man" or "fish man;" she who knew the family histories of the itinerant fruit venders and tin peddlers; she who was asked to take supper or pass the night with children in neighboring villages--children of whose parents her aunts had never so much as heard.
I've been an itinerant singer, a circus-rider, when I used to vault like Leotard, and dance on a rope like Blondin.
Music is the "food of love," and Julia fancied for a moment that Antonio might appear as an itinerant organist--but it was only for a moment; for as soon as she figured to herself the Apollo form, bending under the awkward load of a music-grinder, she turned in disgust from the picture.
When an itinerant priest of the persuasion of the Methodists, Baptists, Universalists, or of the more numerous sect of the Presbyterians, was accidentally in the neighborhood, he was ordinarily invited to officiate, and was commonly rewarded for his services by a collection in a hat, before the congregation separated.
He travelled with his engine from farm to farm, from county to county, for as yet the steam threshing-machine was itinerant in this part of Wessex.
All round the arena rose the cries of itinerant merchants: 'Iced malvoisie,' 'Score-cards; ye cannot tell the jousters without a score-card.
rich enough to make the Canadian in his wagon, the itinerant with his consul's paper which commends him "To the charitable," the swarthy Italian with his few broken words of English, the lame pauper hunted by overseers from town to town, even the poor insane or besotted wreck of man or woman, feel the noble exception of your presence and your house from the general bleakness and stoniness; to make such feel that they were greeted with a voice which made them both remember and hope?
He overtook another of these itinerant masses, and examined it.
They were Levantines, itinerant vendors of cheap rugs, and each bore on his arm a bundle.
Casaubon's will had yet reached Ladislaw: the air seemed to be filled with the dissolution of Parliament and the coming election, as the old wakes and fairs were filled with the rival clatter of itinerant shows; and more private noises were taken little notice of.