ivy


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i·vy

 (ī′vē)
n. pl. i·vies
1.
a. A widely cultivated evergreen climbing plant (Hedera helix) native to Eurasia, having palmately lobed leaves, root-bearing young stems, small green flowers grouped in umbels, and blackish or yellowish berries. Also called English ivy.
b. Any of several other woody, climbing or trailing evergreen plants of the genus Hedera of the Northern Hemisphere.
2.
a. Any of various creeping or trailing plants of other genera, such as Boston ivy, ground ivy, or Virginia creeper.
b. Poison ivy.
3. Ivy Informal A university in the Ivy League: Cornell is one of the Ivies. Which Ivy has the most students?

[Middle English ivi, from Old English īfig.]

ivy

(ˈaɪvɪ)
n, pl ivies
1. (Plants) any woody climbing or trailing araliaceous plant of the Old World genus Hedera, esp H. helix, having lobed evergreen leaves and black berry-like fruits
2. (Plants) any of various other climbing or creeping plants, such as Boston ivy, poison ivy, and ground ivy
[Old English īfig; related to Old High German ebah, perhaps to Greek iphuon a plant]
ˈivy-ˌlike adj

i•vy

(ˈaɪ vi)

n., pl. i•vies,
adj. n.
1. a climbing vine, Hedera helix, of the ginseng family, native to Eurasia and N Africa, having smooth, shiny evergreen leaves: widely cultivated.
2. any of various other climbing or trailing plants.
adj.
3. (often cap.) Ivy League.
[before 900; Middle English ivi; Old English ifig; akin to Old High German ebah]
i′vy•like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ivy - Old World vine with lobed evergreen leaves and black berrylike fruitsivy - Old World vine with lobed evergreen leaves and black berrylike fruits
genus Hedera, Hedera - Old World woody vines
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
Translations
لَبْلابلُبْلابٌ
břečťan
efeuvedbend
muratti
bršljan
borostyán
bergflétta
ツタ
담쟁이덩굴
hedera
gebenė
efeja
brečtan
bršljan
murgröna
ไม้เลื้อยชื่อต้นไอวี่
cây thường xuân

ivy

nEfeu m

ivy

[ˈaɪvɪ] n (Bot) → edera

ivy

(ˈaivi) noun
a type of climbing evergreen plant with small shiny leaves that grows up trees and walls.

ivy

لُبْلابٌ břečťan efeu Efeu κισσός hiedra muratti lierre bršljan edera ツタ 담쟁이덩굴 klimop eføy bluszcz hera плющ murgröna ไม้เลื้อยชื่อต้นไอวี่ sarmaşık cây thường xuân 常春藤

ivy

n. hiedra.
References in classic literature ?
The farmhouses were my delight, with thatched roofs, ivy up to the eaves, latticed windows, and stout women with rosy children at the doors.
Yes, and handsome, after a rude fashion, and clothed with ivy from base to summit, as with a shirt of scale mail.
She was just thinking this when she saw that, at the end of the path she was following, there seemed to be a long wall, with ivy growing over it.
She heard the joyous singing of birds among the ivy that clothed the ruins.
The crisp leaves of holly, mistletoe, and ivy reflected back the light, as if so many little mirrors had been scattered there; and such a mighty blaze went roaring up the chimney, as that dull petrification of a hearth had never known in Scrooge's time, or Marley's, or for many and many a winter season gone.
There was a little green perspective of trellis-work and ivy at the side of our cottage, through which I could see, from the garden where I was walking, into the road before the house.
I had stopped to look at the house as I passed; and its seared red brick walls, blocked windows, and strong green ivy clasping even the stacks of chimneys with its twigs and tendons, as if with sinewy old arms, had made up a rich attractive mystery, of which I was the hero.
Ivy mantled its sides in some places, and in others oaks and holly bushes, whose roots found nourishment in the cliffs of the crag, waved over the precipices below, like the plumage of the warrior over his steel helmet, giving grace to that whose chief expression was terror.
There was a rustle of chirruping sparrows in the green lacquer leaves of the ivy, and the blue cloud-shadows chased themselves across the grass like swallows.
Instead of blackening the streets, the wire nerves of the telephone are now out of sight under the roadway, and twining into the basements of buildings like a new sort of metallic ivy.
Nor were their ornaments like those in use to-day, set off by Tyrian purple, and silk tortured in endless fashions, but the wreathed leaves of the green dock and ivy, wherewith they went as bravely and becomingly decked as our Court dames with all the rare and far-fetched artifices that idle curiosity has taught them.
The moat was dry on this side, as these were times of peace, and Arthur was further favored by a stout ivy vine which grew out from an upper window.