ivy


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i·vy

 (ī′vē)
n. pl. i·vies
1.
a. A widely cultivated evergreen climbing plant (Hedera helix) native to Eurasia, having palmately lobed leaves, root-bearing young stems, small green flowers grouped in umbels, and blackish or yellowish berries. Also called English ivy.
b. Any of several other woody, climbing or trailing evergreen plants of the genus Hedera of the Northern Hemisphere.
2.
a. Any of various creeping or trailing plants of other genera, such as Boston ivy, ground ivy, or Virginia creeper.
b. Poison ivy.
3. Ivy Informal A university in the Ivy League: Cornell is one of the Ivies. Which Ivy has the most students?

[Middle English ivi, from Old English īfig.]

ivy

(ˈaɪvɪ)
n, pl ivies
1. (Plants) any woody climbing or trailing araliaceous plant of the Old World genus Hedera, esp H. helix, having lobed evergreen leaves and black berry-like fruits
2. (Plants) any of various other climbing or creeping plants, such as Boston ivy, poison ivy, and ground ivy
[Old English īfig; related to Old High German ebah, perhaps to Greek iphuon a plant]
ˈivy-ˌlike adj

i•vy

(ˈaɪ vi)

n., pl. i•vies,
adj. n.
1. a climbing vine, Hedera helix, of the ginseng family, native to Eurasia and N Africa, having smooth, shiny evergreen leaves: widely cultivated.
2. any of various other climbing or trailing plants.
adj.
3. (often cap.) Ivy League.
[before 900; Middle English ivi; Old English ifig; akin to Old High German ebah]
i′vy•like`, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ivy - Old World vine with lobed evergreen leaves and black berrylike fruitsivy - Old World vine with lobed evergreen leaves and black berrylike fruits
genus Hedera, Hedera - Old World woody vines
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
Translations
لَبْلابلُبْلابٌ
břečťan
efeuvedbend
muratti
bršljan
borostyán
bergflétta
ツタ
담쟁이덩굴
hedera
gebenė
efeja
brečtan
bršljan
murgröna
ไม้เลื้อยชื่อต้นไอวี่
cây thường xuân

ivy

nEfeu m

ivy

[ˈaɪvɪ] n (Bot) → edera

ivy

(ˈaivi) noun
a type of climbing evergreen plant with small shiny leaves that grows up trees and walls.

ivy

لُبْلابٌ břečťan efeu Efeu κισσός hiedra muratti lierre bršljan edera ツタ 담쟁이덩굴 klimop eføy bluszcz hera плющ murgröna ไม้เลื้อยชื่อต้นไอวี่ sarmaşık cây thường xuân 常春藤

ivy

n. hiedra.
References in classic literature ?
Softened and mellowed by ancient ivy stood these sentinels of sorrow, their scarred faces still revealing the rents and gashes of shrapnel and of bomb.
There were bare flower-beds on either side of it and against the walls ivy grew thickly.
Methinks there's a genius Roams in the mountains, Girdled with ivy And robed in wisteria, Lips ever smiling, Of noble demeanour, Driving the yellow pard, Tiger-attended, Couched in a chariot With banners of cassia, Cloaked with the orchid, And crowned with azaleas; Culling the perfume Of sweet flowers, he leaves In the heart a dream-blossom, Memory haunting.
No rays from the holy heaven come down On the long night-time of that town; But light from out the lurid sea Streams up the turrets silently - Gleams up the pinnacles far and free - Up domes - up spires - up kingly halls - Up fanes - up Babylon-like walls - Up shadowy long-forgotten bowers Of scultured ivy and stone flowers - Up many and many a marvellous shrine Whose wreathed friezes intertwine The viol, the violet, and the vine.
Caesar had his Brutus--the cotton has its boliworm, the chorus girl has her Pittsburger, the summer boarder has his poison ivy, the hero has his Carnegie medal, art has its Morgan, the rose has its--"
The house was overrun with ivy, its chimney being enlarged by the boughs of the parasite to the aspect of a ruined tower.
You look rather fagged, and it's a goodish way to Ivy Lane," he said, by way of giving him an excuse not to go himself.
Pickwick,' resumed the host, after a short pause, 'for I love it dearly, and know no other--the old houses and fields seem like living friends to me; and so does our little church with the ivy, about which, by the bye, our excellent friend there made a song when he first came amongst us.
Throughout the day they sat peaceful and solemn, with closed eyes, in the cool darkness shed round them by the ivy.
On the right of this valley opened another of less extent, adorned with several villages, and terminated by one of the towers of an old ruined abby, grown over with ivy, and part of the front, which remained still entire.
With a slight rustle of her white dress trimmed with moss and ivy, with a gleam of white shoulders, glossy hair, and sparkling diamonds, she passed between the men who made way for her, not looking at any of them but smiling on all, as if graciously allowing each the privilege of admiring her beautiful figure and shapely shoulders, back, and bosom- which in the fashion of those days were very much exposed- and she seemed to bring the glamour of a ballroom with her as she moved toward Anna Pavlovna.
Katharine, Katharine," he said aloud, and then, looking round, saw Mary walking slowly away from him, tearing a long spray of ivy from the trees as she passed them.