jaboticaba


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ja·bo·ti·ca·ba

 (zhə-bo͝o′tĭ-kä′bə)
n.
A Brazilian shrub or small tree (Myrciaria cauliflora) cultivated for its edible purplish-black fruits, which are borne directly on the trunk and larger branches.

[Portuguese, from Tupí iauoti kaua, having branches tipped with black fruit.]

jaboticaba

(dʒəˌbuːtɪˈkæbə)
n
(Plants) an evergreen tropical tree, Myrciaria cauliflora, that is native to the West Indies and Brazil and which has white flowers and purple fruit

ja•bo•ti•ca•ba

(ʒəˌbu tɪˈkɑ bə)

n., pl. -bas.
a Brazilian evergreen tree, Myrciaria cauliflora, of the myrtle family, bearing clusters of grapelike fruit on the trunk.
[1815–25; < Portuguese jabuticaba]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jaboticaba - small evergreen tropical tree native to Brazil and West Indies but introduced into southern United States; grown in Brazil for its edible tough-skinned purple grapelike fruit that grows all along the branches
jaboticaba - tough-skinned purple grapelike tropical fruit grown in Brazil
genus Myrciaria, Myrcia, Myrciaria - a genus of tropical American trees and shrubs of the myrtle family
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
2.jaboticaba - tough-skinned purple grapelike tropical fruit grown in Brazil
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
jaboticaba, jaboticaba tree, Myrciaria cauliflora - small evergreen tropical tree native to Brazil and West Indies but introduced into southern United States; grown in Brazil for its edible tough-skinned purple grapelike fruit that grows all along the branches
References in periodicals archive ?
Sao conhecidas em torno de nove especies de jabuticabeira (MATTOS, 1978), dentre as quais se destacam Plinia trunciflora (DC) Berg ('Jabuticaba de Cabinho'), Plinia cauliflora ('Jabuticaba Paulista' ou 'Jabuticaba Acu') e Plinia jaboticaba (Vell) ('Jabuticaba Sabara') (DONADIO, 1983; MATTOS, 1983).
Homemade syrup might be made with lilikoi, jaboticaba or Surinam cherries.
Such trees provide the shade for the secondary forest, which emerges with the tall cedro, the fruit-giving pitanga and jaboticaba, and many other trees, including coffee itself.