jack-in-the-pulpit


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Related to jack-in-the-pulpit: Arisaema atrorubens

jack-in-the-pul·pit

(jăk′ĭn-thə-po͝ol′pĭt, -pŭl′-)
n. pl. jack-in-the-pulpits
An eastern North American tuberous herb (Arisaema triphyllum) having three-lobed leaves and a striped, leaflike spathe that curls over an upright spadix. Also called regionally Indian turnip.

[From the resemblance of the inflorescence to a person standing in a pulpit.]

jack-in-the-pulpit

n
1. (Plants) an E North American aroid plant, Arisaema triphyllum, having a leaflike spathe partly arched over a clublike spadix
2. (Plants) Brit another name for cuckoopint

jack′-in-the-pul′pit



n., pl. -pul•pits.
any North American plant of the genus Arisaema, of the arum family, having an upright spadix arched over by a spathe.
[1840–50, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jack-in-the-pulpit - common American spring-flowering woodland herb having sheathing leaves and an upright club-shaped spadix with overarching green and purple spathe producing scarlet berriesjack-in-the-pulpit - common American spring-flowering woodland herb having sheathing leaves and an upright club-shaped spadix with overarching green and purple spathe producing scarlet berries
aroid, arum - any plant of the family Araceae; have small flowers massed on a spadix surrounded by a large spathe
Arisaema, genus Arisaema - tuberous or rhizomatous herbaceous perennials
2.jack-in-the-pulpit - common European arum with lanceolate spathe and short purple spadixjack-in-the-pulpit - common European arum with lanceolate spathe and short purple spadix; emerges in early spring; source of a starch called arum
aroid, arum - any plant of the family Araceae; have small flowers massed on a spadix surrounded by a large spathe
genus Arum - type genus of the Araceae: tuberous perennial herbs of Europe and Asia with usually heart-shaped leaves
arum - starch resembling sago that is obtained from cuckoopint root
References in periodicals archive ?
Bales, a naturalist and author, provides 12 essays about nature in East Tennessee, describing fleeting, short-lived, or transient flora and fauna: the short-eared owl; the jack-in-the-pulpit plant; the cerulean warbler; the ghost plant, which grows in areas without sunlight; the Appalachian panda, an ancestor of the red panda; the ruby-throated hummingbird; the freshwater jellyfish; the monarch butterfly; the seldom-seen lake sturgeon and its reintroduction into the waters of the Tennessee Valley; the whooping crane; the southern pine beetle; and the coyote-wolf and coyote-dog hybrids and their emergence in the eastern states.
A prominent aroid in Georgia is the Jack-in-the-pulpit.
Bizarre botanicals; how to grow string-of-hearts, jack-in-the-pulpit, panda ginger, and other weird and wonderful plants.
In this month the tea is cold before you get to it and the rhododendron all leaves for another year and she says Buddhists revere relics as well and worship teeth and bones from the ashes and she's finished a whole set of revisions and will keep after it and I hear on the morning news a cashier in France has written a book saying mothers in line threaten their screaming children with growing up to be cashiers and the reliquaries hold bones in silver as elaborate as the pistils of the jack-in-the-pulpit as sparrows eat the coats of oil off the radiators of cars as daylilies collapse in time-lapse, and as the farmer hefts a bag of grain on his shoulders going up the hill never thinking anything about it (who'd have thought desire would go?
BIZARRE BOTANICALS: HOW TO GROW STRING-OF-HEARTS, JACK-IN-THE-PULPIT, PANDA GINGER, AND OTHER WEIRD AND WONDERFUL PLANTS is a 'must' for any gardener with access to a hothouse and a desire to grow something out of the ordinary.