jack-tar


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jack-tar

also Jack-tar (jăk′tär′)
n.
A sailor.

jack′-tar′

or Jack′ Tar′,



n.
a sailor.
[1775–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jack-tar - a man who serves as a sailorJack-tar - a man who serves as a sailor  
able seaman, able-bodied seaman - a seaman in the merchant marine; trained in special skills
boatswain, bo's'n, bos'n, bosun, bo'sun - a petty officer on a merchant ship who controls the work of other seamen
deckhand, roustabout - a member of a ship's crew who performs manual labor
helmsman, steerer, steersman - the person who steers a ship
bargee, bargeman, lighterman - someone who operates a barge
ship's officer, officer - a person authorized to serve in a position of authority on a vessel; "he is the officer in charge of the ship's engines"
pilot - a person qualified to guide ships through difficult waters going into or out of a harbor
crewman, sailor - any member of a ship's crew
sea lawyer - an argumentative and contentious seaman
whaler - a seaman who works on a ship that hunts whales

jack-tar

noun
A person engaged in sailing or working on a ship:
Informal: salt, tar.
Slang: gob.
References in classic literature ?
And hardly had the carriage turned the corner and rattled into the high road with this inexplicable pair, than the whistle broke forth - prolonged, and low and tremulous; and the groom, already so far relieved, vented the rest of his surprise in one simple English word, friendly to the mouth of Jack-tar and the sooty pitman, and hurried to spread the news round the servants' hall of Naseby House.
Jack and Gill have been the prototypical names for every ordinary man and woman since at least the 15th Century, and then there are examples like Jack-of-all-trades, Jack-Tar for a sailor, lumberjack and steeplejack.
In those days, Halifax, Nova Scotia, was a bustling British colonial port, and there were plenty of thirsty redcoats and jack-tars about.