jackdaw


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jack·daw

 (jăk′dô′)
n.
Either of two small corvids (Corvus monedula or C. dauricus) of Eurasia and North Africa, having black and gray or black and white plumage.

jackdaw

(ˈdʒækˌdɔː)
n
(Animals) a large common Eurasian passerine bird, Corvus monedula, in which the plumage is black and dark grey: noted for its thieving habits: family Corvidae (crows)
[C16: from jack1 + daw]

jack•daw

(ˈdʒækˌdɔ)

n.
a small Eurasian crow with a gray nape, Corvus monedula, that nests in chimneys and rock cavities.
[1535–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jackdaw - common black-and-grey Eurasian bird noted for thieveryjackdaw - common black-and-grey Eurasian bird noted for thievery
corvine bird - birds of the crow family
genus Corvus, Corvus - type genus of the Corvidae: crows and ravens
Translations
زاغ، غُراب الزَّرع
чавка
kavka
allike
naakka
čavka
csóka
dvergkráka
kuosa
kovārnis
cioacă
kavka
kavka
kaja
küçük karga
галка

jackdaw

[ˈdʒækdɔː] Ngrajilla f

jackdaw

[ˈdʒækdɔː] nchoucas m

jackdaw

nDohle f

jackdaw

[ˈdʒækˌdɔː] ntaccola

jackdaw

(ˈdʒӕkdoː) noun
a type of bird of the crow family that sometimes steals bright objects.
References in classic literature ?
Her friends repeated the pleasing phrase enthusiastically, and for several minutes she stood, like a jackdaw in the fable, enjoying her borrowed plumes, while the rest chattered like a party of magpies.
At which times they would approach as near as they durst, and imitate my actions after the manner of monkeys, but ever with great signs of hatred; as a tame jackdaw with cap and stockings is always persecuted by the wild ones, when he happens to be got among them.
but just as he was beginning to build up the house that he had been making the foundations for, through many a year--you jade of a magpie, jackdaw, and poll-parrot, what do you mean
Presently it began to grow light enough to read, so I drew out a little pocket copy of the "Ingoldsby Legends" which I had brought with me, and read "The Jackdaw of Rheims.
Well, you know," said the sharp-nosed man they called Jackdaw in a squeaky and unsteady voice, raising himself at the other side of the fire, "a plump man gets thin, but for a thin one it's death.
The ugly jackdaw, collecting all the fine feathers which had fallen from the other birds, attached them to his own body and appeared at the examination, looking very gay.
He follows rigidly the conventions of dress and manners; but in the business of poking his nose into places where he does not belong he could give pointers to a civet cat or a jackdaw.
The jackdaw cage occupied one wall; and the other was adorned by a small hatchet, a pair of climbing irons, and his tin candle-box, in which he was for the time being endeavouring to raise a hopeful young family of field-mice.
Anon they turn into narrower and steeper staircases, and the night-air begins to blow upon them, and the chirp of some startled jackdaw or frightened rook precedes the heavy beating of wings in a confined space, and the beating down of dust and straws upon their heads.
He was small and bent, and perhaps not actively strong; yet he was as tough as an old yew-tree, and as crusty as an old jackdaw.
Wickfield, to the scene of my future studies - a grave building in a courtyard, with a learned air about it that seemed very well suited to the stray rooks and jackdaws who came down from the Cathedral towers to walk with a clerkly bearing on the grass-plot - and was introduced to my new master, Doctor Strong.
The jackdaws were eating pie- crust, and the magpie was drinking gravy out of a patty-pan.