jacket


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jack·et

 (jăk′ĭt)
n.
1. A short coat usually extending to the hips.
2. An outer covering or casing, especially:
a. The skin of a potato.
b. The dust jacket of a book or phonograph record.
c. An insulation covering for a steam pipe, wire, boiler, or similar part.
d. An open envelope or folder for filing papers.
e. The outer metal shell or case of a bullet.
3. A piece of jewelry or other ornament that attaches to an earring stud.
tr.v. jack·et·ed, jack·et·ing, jack·ets
To supply or cover with a jacket.

[Middle English jaket, from Old French jaquet, diminutive of jaque, short jacket, tunic, from jacques, nickname for French peasants, from the name Jacques; see jack.]

jack′et·ed adj.

jacket

(ˈdʒækɪt)
n
1. (Clothing & Fashion) a short coat, esp one that is hip-length and has a front opening and sleeves
2. something that resembles this or is designed to be worn around the upper part of the body: a life jacket.
3. (Mechanical Engineering) any exterior covering or casing, such as the insulating cover of a boiler
4. (Mechanical Engineering) the part of the cylinder block of an internal-combustion engine that encloses the coolant
5. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) See dust jacket
6. (Cookery)
a. the skin of a baked potato
b. (as modifier): jacket potatoes.
7. (Military) a metal casing used in certain types of ammunition
8. US a cover to protect a gramophone record. Brit name: sleeve
9. chiefly US a folder or envelope to hold documents
vb
(tr) to put a jacket on (someone or something)
[C15: from Old French jaquet short jacket, from jacque peasant, from proper name Jacques James]
ˈjacketed adj
ˈjacket-ˌlike adj

jack•et

(ˈdʒæk ɪt)
n.
1. a short coat, in any of various forms, usu. opening down the front.
2. a garmentlike article designed to be placed around the body for some use other than as clothing. Compare life jacket, straitjacket.
3. a protective outer covering.
4. the skin of a potato, esp. when it has been cooked.
5. a removable paper cover for protecting the binding of a book, usu. bearing the title and author's name.
6. an envelope, holder, or cover of cardboard or paper, as for a phonograph record or a document.
7. a metal casing, as the steel covering around the barrel of a gun or the core of a bullet.
v.t.
8. to put a jacket on.
[1425–75; jaket < Middle French ja(c)quet=jaque(s) jacket, short, plain upper garment, probably after jacques peasant (see Jacquerie) + -et -et]
jack′et•ed, adj.
jack′et•less, adj.

jacket


Past participle: jacketed
Gerund: jacketing

Imperative
jacket
jacket
Present
I jacket
you jacket
he/she/it jackets
we jacket
you jacket
they jacket
Preterite
I jacketed
you jacketed
he/she/it jacketed
we jacketed
you jacketed
they jacketed
Present Continuous
I am jacketing
you are jacketing
he/she/it is jacketing
we are jacketing
you are jacketing
they are jacketing
Present Perfect
I have jacketed
you have jacketed
he/she/it has jacketed
we have jacketed
you have jacketed
they have jacketed
Past Continuous
I was jacketing
you were jacketing
he/she/it was jacketing
we were jacketing
you were jacketing
they were jacketing
Past Perfect
I had jacketed
you had jacketed
he/she/it had jacketed
we had jacketed
you had jacketed
they had jacketed
Future
I will jacket
you will jacket
he/she/it will jacket
we will jacket
you will jacket
they will jacket
Future Perfect
I will have jacketed
you will have jacketed
he/she/it will have jacketed
we will have jacketed
you will have jacketed
they will have jacketed
Future Continuous
I will be jacketing
you will be jacketing
he/she/it will be jacketing
we will be jacketing
you will be jacketing
they will be jacketing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been jacketing
you have been jacketing
he/she/it has been jacketing
we have been jacketing
you have been jacketing
they have been jacketing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been jacketing
you will have been jacketing
he/she/it will have been jacketing
we will have been jacketing
you will have been jacketing
they will have been jacketing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been jacketing
you had been jacketing
he/she/it had been jacketing
we had been jacketing
you had been jacketing
they had been jacketing
Conditional
I would jacket
you would jacket
he/she/it would jacket
we would jacket
you would jacket
they would jacket
Past Conditional
I would have jacketed
you would have jacketed
he/she/it would have jacketed
we would have jacketed
you would have jacketed
they would have jacketed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jacket - a short coatjacket - a short coat        
banian, banyan - a loose fitting jacket; originally worn in India
bed jacket - a lightweight jacket worn over bedclothes (as when sitting in bed)
blazer, sport coat, sport jacket, sports coat, sports jacket - lightweight single-breasted jacket; often striped in the colors of a club or school
bolero - a short jacket; worn mostly by women
bomber jacket - a jacket gathered into a band at the waist
bush jacket - a loose fitting jacket; resembles a shirt with four patch pockets and a belt
coat - an outer garment that has sleeves and covers the body from shoulder down; worn outdoors
dolman, dolman jacket - a hussar's jacket worn over the shoulders
donkey jacket - a short thick jacket; often worn by workmen
double-breasted jacket - a jacket having fronts that overlap enough for two separate rows of buttons
doublet - a man's close-fitting jacket; worn during the Renaissance
dressing sack, dressing sacque - a woman's loose jacket; worn while dressing
Eton jacket - a jacket hanging to the waist and cut square at the bottom
hug-me-tight - a woman's fitted jacket
jerkin - a tight sleeveless and collarless jacket (often made of leather) worn by men in former times
jumper - a loose jacket or blouse worn by workmen
lumber jacket, lumberjack - a short warm outer jacket
Mao jacket - a light weight jacket with a high collar; worn by Mao Zedong and the Chinese people during his regime
mess jacket, monkey jacket, shell jacket - waist-length jacket tapering to a point at the back; worn by officers in the mess for formal dinners
Norfolk jacket - loose-fitting single-breasted jacket
anorak, parka, windbreaker, windcheater - a kind of heavy jacket (`windcheater' is a British term)
pea jacket, peacoat - a sailor's heavy woolen double-breasted jacket
sacque, sack - a woman's full loose hiplength jacket
single-breasted jacket - a jacket having fronts that overlap only enough for a single row of buttons
morning coat, swallowtail, swallow-tailed coat - a man's full-dress jacket with two long tapering tails at the back
2.jacket - an outer wrapping or casing; "phonograph records were sold in cardboard jackets"
record jacket - the jacket for a phonograph record
wrapping, wrapper, wrap - the covering (usually paper or cellophane) in which something is wrapped
book jacket, dust cover, dust jacket, dust wrapper - a paper jacket for a book; a jacket on which promotional information is usually printed
3.jacket - (dentistry) dental appliance consisting of an artificial crown for a broken or decayed tooth; "tomorrow my dentist will fit me for a crown"
dental appliance - a device to repair teeth or replace missing teeth
dental medicine, dentistry, odontology - the branch of medicine dealing with the anatomy and development and diseases of the teeth
4.jacket - the outer skin of a potato
Irish potato, murphy, potato, spud, tater, white potato - an edible tuber native to South America; a staple food of Ireland
peel, skin - the rind of a fruit or vegetable
5.jacket - the tough metal shell casing for certain kinds of ammunition
casing, shell, case - the housing or outer covering of something; "the clock has a walnut case"
Verb1.jacket - provide with a thermally non-conducting cover; "The tubing needs to be jacketed"
cover - provide with a covering or cause to be covered; "cover her face with a handkerchief"; "cover the child with a blanket"; "cover the grave with flowers"
2.jacket - put a jacket on; "The men were jacketed"
apparel, clothe, enclothe, garb, garment, raiment, tog, habilitate, fit out, dress - provide with clothes or put clothes on; "Parents must feed and dress their child"

jacket

noun
1. coat, blazer a black leather jacket
2. covering, casing, case, cover, skin, shell, coat, wrapping, envelope, capsule, folder, sheath, wrapper, encasement, housing potatoes in their jackets

Jackets

acton, anorak, báinín, banyan, Barbour jacket (trademark), bed jacket, biker jacket, blazer, blouson, body warmer, bolero, bomber jacket, boxy jacket, bush jacket, cagoule or cag, cardigan, combat jacket, cymar, denim jacket, dinner jacket or (U.S. & Canad.) tuxedo or tux, dolman, donkey jacket, doublet, duvet or duvet jacket, Eton jacket or bumfreezer, flak jacket, fustian jacket, gambeson, gilet, hacking jacket, hug-me-tight, jerkin, leather jacket, life jacket, lumberjacket, Mackinaw coat or mackinaw (chiefly U.S. & Canad.), matinée jacket, mess jacket, monkey jacket, Norfolk jacket, pourpoint, reefing jacket, sack or sacque, safari jacket, shell jacket, shrug, smoking jacket, spencer, sports jacket or coat, tabard, windcheater or windjammer

jacket

noun
The skin of an animal:
Translations
sakobundapřebal
jakkesmudsomslag
takki
jakna
jakkikápa
ジャケット
재킷
apvāksjakažakete
jopič
kavaj
เสื้อแจ๊กเก็ต
áo khoác

jacket

[ˈdʒækɪt]
A. N
1. (= garment) → chaqueta f, americana f, saco m (LAm)
2. (= cover) [of boiler] → camisa f, envoltura f; [of book] → sobrecubierta f (US) [of record] → funda f
3. [of potato] potatoes baked in their jackets (Brit) → patatas fpl asadas con piel, papas fpl asadas con cáscara (LAm)
B. CPD jacket potatoes NPL (Brit) → patatas fpl asadas con piel, papas fpl asadas con cáscara (LAm)

jacket

[ˈdʒækɪt] n
(= garment) (straight, fitted style)veste f, veston m; (padded or blouson style)blouson m
a black leather jacket → un blouson de cuir noir
potatoes in their jackets (British)des pommes fpl de terre en robe des champs
[boiler] → enveloppe f
[book] → jaquette fjacket potato npomme f de terre en robe des champsjack-in-the-box [ˈdʒækɪnðəbɒks] ndiable m à ressort

jacket

n
(= garment)Jacke f; (= man’s tailored jacket)Jackett nt; (= life jacket)Schwimmweste f
(of book)Schutzumschlag m, → Buchhülle f; (US: of record) → Plattenhülle f
(esp US: for papers etc) → Umschlag m
jacket potatoes, potatoes (baked) in their jackets(in der Schale) gebackene Kartoffeln pl
(Tech: of boiler etc) → Mantel m, → Ummantelung f

jacket

[ˈdʒækɪt] n (garment) → giacca; (of book) → sopraccopertina; (of boiler) → incamiciatura; (of potato) → buccia

jacket

(ˈdʒӕkit) noun
1. a short coat. He wore brown trousers and a blue jacket.
2. a covering, especially a loose paper cover for a book. I like the design on this (book-)jacket.

jacket

سُتْرَةٌ sako jakke Jacke σακάκι chaqueta takki veste jakna giacca ジャケット 재킷 jasje jakke marynarka blusão, jaqueta пиджак kavaj เสื้อแจ๊กเก็ต ceket áo khoác 夹克衫

jack·et

n. forro; corsé, soporte del tronco y de la espina dorsal usado para corregir deformidades.

jacket

n chaqueta, chamarra (esp. Mex)
References in classic literature ?
She put on her hat and jacket as noiselessly as possible, and going to the back entry window, got out upon the roof of a low porch, swung herself down to the grassy bank, and took a roundabout way to the road.
Antonia and her father went off hand in hand, and I buttoned up my jacket and raced my shadow home.
you can tell me little of the Royal Americans that I don't know, though I do wear a hunting-shirt instead of a scarlet jacket.
As Alice came into the room, her eyes fell upon the carpenter, who was standing near its centre, clad in green woollen jacket, a pair of loose breeches, open at the knees, and with a long pocket for his rule, the end of which protruded; it was as proper a mark of the artisan's calling as Mr.
It was suddenly interrupted by the appearance of a negro in tow-cloth jacket and trowsers.
After thinking some time on the bed-side, I got up and took off my monkey jacket, and then stood in the middle of the room thinking.
As, after this interlude, the seamen resumed their work upon the jacket of the whale, many strange things were hinted in reference to this wild affair.
Joe gave a pull at his necktie and a twitch at his jacket, and was off in a moment.
The eyes of every one in the room were upon her, awaiting her decision; and at last, half blind with her tears, she began fumbling in her jacket, where she had pinned the precious money.
I see that my neighbor, who bears the familiar epithet William or Edwin, takes it off with his jacket.
Once when I turned short and dodged under his arm he made a grab and got me by the jacket between my shoulders, and I thought I was gone; but I slid out of the jacket quick as lightning, and saved myself.
In a safe place Tom examined two large needles which were thrust into the lapels of his jacket, and had thread bound about them -- one needle carried white thread and the other black.