jacks


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jack

 (jăk)
n.
1. often Jack Informal A man; a fellow.
2.
a. One who does odd or heavy jobs; a laborer.
b. One who works in a specified manual trade. Often used in combination: a lumberjack; a steeplejack.
c. Jack A sailor; a tar.
3. Abbr. J Games A playing card showing the figure of a servant or soldier and ranking below a queen. Also called knave.
4. Games
a. jacks(used with a sing. or pl. verb) A game played with a set of small, six-pointed, traditionally metal pieces and a small ball, the object being to pick up the pieces in various combinations.
b. One of the six-pointed pieces so used.
5. Sports A pin used in some games of bowling.
6.
a. A usually portable device for raising heavy objects by means of force applied with a lever, screw, or hydraulic press.
b. A wooden wedge for cleaving rock.
7. A device used for turning a spit.
8. Nautical
a. A support or brace, especially the iron crosstree on a topgallant masthead.
b. A small flag flown at the bow of a ship, usually to indicate nationality.
9. The male of certain animals, especially the ass.
10. Any of various food and game fishes of the family Carangidae, found in tropical and temperate seas.
11. A jackrabbit.
12. A socket that accepts a plug at one end and attaches to electric circuitry at the other.
13. Slang Money.
14. Applejack.
15. Slang A small or worthless amount: You don't know jack about that.
v. jacked, jack·ing, jacks
v.tr.
1. To hunt or fish for with a jacklight: hunters illegally jacking deer.
2.
a. To move or hoist by using a jack. Often used with up: jacked the rear of the car to replace the tire.
b. To raise (something) to a higher level, as in cost. Often used with up: "Foreign producers jacked up the price on some steels by over 100%" (Forbes).
3. Baseball To hit (a pitched ball) hard, especially for a home run.
4. Slang
a. To steal: Someone jacked my bike.
b. To rob or cheat: The dealer jacked me on the price.
v.intr.
1. To hunt or fish by using a jacklight.
2. To plug into an electronic device by means of a jack.
Phrasal Verbs:
jack around
1. To spend time idly.
2. To toy, tinker, or mess: He's been jacking around with that motor for days.
3. To take unfair advantage of, deceive, or manipulate.
jack off Vulgar Slang
1. To masturbate. Usually used of a man.
2. To bring (someone) to orgasm.
jack up
To excite emotionally.

[From the name Jack, from Middle English Jakke, possibly from Old French Jacques, from Late Latin Iacōbus; see Jacob. N., sense 15, short for jack shit. V. tr., senses 4a and b, short for hijack.]

jack′er n.

jacks

(dʒæks)
n
(Games, other than specified) (functioning as singular) a game in which bone, metal, or plastic pieces (jackstones) are thrown and then picked up in various groups between bounces or throws of a small ball. Sometimes called: knucklebones
[C19: shortened from jackstones, variant of checkstones pebbles]

Jacks

A children’s game played with a small ball and several jacks (see Jack, number 1).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Jacks - a game in which jackstones are thrown and picked up in various groups between bounces of a small rubber balljacks - a game in which jackstones are thrown and picked up in various groups between bounces of a small rubber ball
child's game - a game enjoyed by children
References in classic literature ?
But the novel disaster quenched her courage for a time, for public opinion is a giant which has frightened stouter-hearted Jacks on bigger beanstalks than hers.
I determined to ask Joe why he had ever taught me to call those picture-cards, Jacks, which ought to be called knaves.
It was a small bit of pork suspended from the kettle-hanger by a string passed through a large door-key, in a way known to primitive housekeepers unpossessed of jacks.
Inspector Jacks from Scotland Yard, sir," he announced.
In appalling masks; hideous, hairy, red-eyed Jacks in Boxes; Vampire Kites; demoniacal Tumblers who wouldn't lie down, and were perpetually flying forward, to stare infants out of countenance; his soul perfectly revelled.
Daylight showed four queens and an ace; MacDonald four jacks and an ace; and Kearns four kings and a trey.
What jacks we were to let those dogs in and kick up such a row," observed Steve, after a prolonged peep.
The cord was made in England: A rough cord, a tough cord, A cord that bowmen love; So we'll drain our jacks To the English flax And the land where the hemp was wove.
Past the old church, and down the footpath, pottered the old man and the child hand-in-hand early on the afternoon of the day before the feast, and wandered all round the ground, which was already being occupied by the "cheap Jacks," with their green- covered carts and marvellous assortment of wares; and the booths of more legitimate small traders, with their tempting arrays of fairings and eatables; and penny peep-shows and other shows, containing pink-eyed ladies, and dwarfs, and boa-constrictors, and wild Indians.
You pray that your Granny may have strength enough left her at the last (she's strong for an old one, Johnny), to get up from her bed and run and hide herself and swown to death in a hole, sooner than fall into the hands of those Cruel Jacks we read of that dodge and drive, and worry and weary, and scorn and shame, the decent poor.
I could wish it done as soon as it can be done, Wickfield,' said Doctor Strong, 'for Jack Maldon is needy, and idle; and of those two bad things, worse things sometimes come.
Moore," she said, "that you do everything in your power to discourage this tendency in Jack, he--"; but she got no further.