jackscrew


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jack·screw

 (jăk′skro͞o′)
n.
A jack operated by a screw. Also called screw jack.

jackscrew

(ˈdʒækˌskruː)
n
(Tools) another name for screw jack
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jackscrew - screw-operated jackjackscrew - screw-operated jack      
jack - tool for exerting pressure or lifting
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References in periodicals archive ?
aspx) NTSB said, "Alaska Airlines flight 261 accident was the loss of airplane pitch control resulting from in-flight failure of the horizontal stabilizer trim system jackscrew assembly's acme nut thread.
Trim, unlike that on most Cessnas, is through a jackscrew in the tail rather than via a trim tab, and the system's low gearing means you move the wheel a bit before noticing the effect.
it's almost impossible to fill up the heads of the mounting bolts or the threads of the jackscrew holes with plastic.
To meet the needs of electronic assemblies being used in extremely harsh environments including robotics, motor sports and satellites, earlier this year Harwin also released its J-Tek jackscrew fixing for its 2mm pitch Datamate high reliability connectors.
This end should also have a jackscrew to adjust as the bit advanced through the work piece.
While analyzing wreckage, investigators found the pitch trim jackscrew in the full nose-down position.
Then, with the hopper tilted back by an electric jackscrew, maintenance personnel can easily reach all areas of the cutting chamber.
The cable is drawn up by a jackscrew to press the limbs (Prototech Industries, Inc.
Investigators concluded that the airline's failure to properly lubricate and check the horizontal stabilizer jackscrew for wear directly related to the crash.
A complete line of accessories such as jackscrew, hydraulic and gear-driven overrides is available.
While preparing for a 2,000-hour inspection of the jackscrew mechanism on aircraft 266, Petty Officer Maynor removed a panel to access hardware associated with the inspection.
Multiple latching versions, including squeeze, lanyard and jackscrew, for greater flexibility in system design and cable routing.