Jacobites


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Jacobites

Supporters of the Stuart pretenders to the British crown. They mounted unsuccessful rebellions in 1715 and 1745.
References in classic literature ?
Yes, but so far," answered the other, "from speaking in behalf of his religion, he assured me the Catholicks did not expect to be any gainers by the change; for that Prince Charles was as good a Protestant as any in England; and that nothing but regard to right made him and the rest of the popish party to be Jacobites.
If a man like your brother likes to go into Parliament as a yeoman or a gentleman or a Jacobite or an Ancient Briton, I should say it would be a jolly good thing.
He threw himself into the struggle of party, first as a Whig, then as a Tory; but as a friend said of him later, "He was neither Whig nor Tory, neither Jacobite nor Republican.
It is true that his nature was extremely conservative; that after a brief period of youthful free thinking he was fanatically loyal to the national Church and to the king (though theoretically he was a Jacobite, a supporter of the supplanted Stuarts as against the reigning House of Hanover); and that in conversation he was likely to roar down or scowl down all innovators and their defenders or silence them with such observations as, 'Sir, I perceive you are a vile Whig.
The monument, which marks the spot where Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Jacobites raised their standard in 1745, is now tilting alarmingly to the west.
1745: The Jacobites, under the Young Pretender, occupied Edinburgh.
In which battle were the Jacobites defeated by the royal army under the Duke of Cumberland in 1746?
One such focus relates to contemporary Scottish ideological and cultural norms, deeply imbedded in time and place that provided Jacobites with the motivational force, hence momentum, for their sustained challenge to the existing political order.
Despite substantial, if often furtive, support from the Jacobites who championed their cause, he was defeated by the Duke of Cumberland at the Battle of Culloden in 1746 and fled with a few loyal supporters to the Isle of Skye.
The Earl of Mar led James' supporters - known as Jacobites - but the insurrection was a MONARCH: miserable failure with the rebels surrendering at Preston.
Many believe the name was born in the Jacobite Rebellion of 1745 when the Jacobites by-passed Newcastle which, as well as favouring King George, was also a well-guarded garrison.